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Food wastage footprint & Climate Change









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Food Wastage Footprint: Full cost-accounting
    Final report
    2014
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    Approximately one-third of all food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted. The economic costs of this food wastage are substantial and amount to about USD 1 trillion each year. However, the hidden costs of food wastage extend much further. Food that is produced, but never consumed, still causes environmental impacts to the atmosphere, water, land and biodiversity. These environmental costs must be paid by society and future generations. Furthermore, by contributing to environmental de gradation and increasing the scarcity of natural resources, food wastage is associated with wider social costs that affect people’s well-being and livelihoods. Quantifying the full costs of food wastage improves our understanding of the global food system and enables action to address supply chain weaknesses and disruptions that are likely to threaten the viability of future food systems, food security and sustainable development. This document introduces a methodology that enables the full-cost accounting (FCA) of the food wastage footprint. Based on the best knowledge and techniques available, FCA measures and values in monetary terms the externality costs associated with the environmental impacts of food wastage. The FCA framework incorporates several elements: market-based valuation of the direct financial costs, non-market valuation of lost ecosystems goods and services, and well-being valuation to assess the social costs associated with natural resource degradation.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Toolkit - Reducing the Food Wastage Footprint 2013
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    One-third of all food produced in the world is lost or wasted from farm to fork, according to estimates calculated by FAO (2011). This wastage not only has an enormous negative impact on the global economy and food availability, it also has major environmental impacts. The direct economic cost of food wastage of agricultural products (excluding fish and seafood), based on producer prices only, is about 750 billion USD, equivalent to the GDP of Switzerland. The aim of the Toolkit is to showcase concrete examples of good practices for food loss and waste reduction, while pointing to information sources, guidelines and pledges favoring food wastage reduction. The inspirational examples featured throughout this Toolkit demonstrate that everyone, from individual households and producers, through governments, to large food industries, can make choices that will ultimately lead to sustainable consumption and production patterns, and thus, a better world for all.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Mitigation of food wastage
    Societal costs and benefits
    2014
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    In recent years, progress has been made globally in establishing sustainable food production systems aimed at improving food and nutrition security and the judicial use of natural resources. Yet, all of those efforts are in vain when the food produced in those systems is lost or wasted and never consumed. As food wastage increases in parallel with production increases, it becomes even more important to recognize that reducing food wastage must be part of any effort aimed at sustainable productio n and food security. In addition to this, there also are environmental repercussions, including all of the natural resources used and greenhouse gases emitted during the production or disposal of food that is not consumed. Analysis of food wastage causalities suggests that it is economically rational to loose food as part of the costs are externalized, and incentives to producers and consumers along the supply chain further encourages not taking into account negative externalities such as enviro nmental costs. However, food wastage has huge environmental impacts and corresponding societal costs that need to be dealt with. Mitigation of this wastage must become a priority for each actor along the food chain. This paper presents a portfolio of potential food wastage mitigation measures, illustrating the gross and net economic, environmental and societal benefits of each. Adopting appropriate food wastage mitigation measures can offer corresponding huge environmental benefits, leading to a ssociated net gains for societies in terms of reduced economic losses and external costs. The performance of measures aiming at avoiding food wastage tends to be higher than for reusing, recycling of food products and certainly higher than landfilling.

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