Thumbnail Image

Antimicrobial Resistance Policy Review and Development Framework

A regional guide for governments in Asia and the Pacific to review, update and develop policies to address antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial use in animal production











Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Drivers, Dynamics and Epidemiology of Antimicrobial Resistance In animal production 2016
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    It is now accepted that increased antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacteria affecting humans and animals in recent decades is primarily influenced by an increase in usage of antimicrobials for a variety of purposes, including therapeutic and non-therapeutic uses in animal production. Antimicrobial resistance is an ancient and naturally occurring phenomenon in bacteria. But the use of antimicrobial drugs – in health care, agriculture or industrial settings – exerts a selection pressure which can favour the survival of resistant strains (or genes) over susceptible ones, leading to a relative increase in resistant bacteria within microbial communities.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Meeting
    Joint FAO/OIE/WHO Expert Workshop on Non-Human Antimicrobial Usage and Antimicrobial Resistance: Scientific assessment
    Geneva, December 1 – 5, 2003
    2003
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Antimicrobial agents are essential drugs for human and animal health and welfare. Antimicrobial resistance is a global public health concern that is impacted by both human and non-human antimicrobial usage. Antimicrobial agents are used in food animals, including from aquaculture, companion animals and horticulture to treat or prevent disease. Antimicrobial agents are sometimes used in food animals to promote growth. The types of antimicrobials used are frequently the same as, or closely rela ted to, antimicrobials used in humans.

    The expert workshop concluded that there is clear evidence of adverse human health consequences due to resistant organisms resulting from non-human usage of antimicrobials. These consequences include infections that would not have otherwise occurred, increased frequency of treatment failures (in some cases death) and increased severity of infections, as documented for instance by fluoroquinolone resistant human Salmonella infections. Evidence shows th at the amount and pattern of non-human usage of antimicrobials impact on the occurrence of resistant bacteria in animals and on food commodities and thereby human exposure to these resistant bacteria. The foodborne route is the major transmission pathway for resistant bacteria and resistance genes from food animals to humans, but other routes of transmission exist. There is much less data available on the public health impact of antimicrobial usage in aquaculture, horticulture and companion an imals.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Managing Antimicrobial Resistance in Thailand - TCP/THA/3503 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a growing global threat. Although much of it can be attributed to the (mis)use of antimicrobials in humans, the overuse of drugs in food animal production also threatens the effective treatment of human and animal diseases. Only limited data on the use of antimicrobials in food animals in Thailand and the Asia and Pacific region are available. However, indirect evidence indicates the widespread misuse of antimicrobials in animal production in the country and region. Awareness of the threat of AMR development and spread is low among public authorities and professionals involved with animal production, and few countries in the region have systems in place to monitor antimicrobial use (AMU) and AMR, carry out risk assessments and develop evidence-based policies for AMR risk management. The project was aimed at assisting the Government of Thailand to contain the spread of AMR in the country through enhanced and harmonized national capacity for AMU and AMR monitoring and AMR risk management, following international guidelines and standards. Project outputs included the development of education and information materials on AMR, guidelines and capacity development activities to reduce the risk of AMR, and the establishment of sample protocols and laboratory diagnostics.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.