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FAO in the 2022 humanitarian appeals










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    Somalia Situation Report – May 2017 2017
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    Poor rains and extended drought over consecutive growing seasons have impacted rural livelihoods and food security in Somalia, pushing the country to the brink of famine. This just five years after the 2011 crisis that claimed the lives of over a quarter million people and as the Somali people continue to rebuild from decades of internal conflict. Some 6.7 million people now face acute food insecurity (IPC phases 2, 3 & 4), with the majority – 68 percent – of severely food insecure (IPC phases 3 & 4) in rural areas (2.2 million). Rural areas are home to nine in ten people at greatest risk – those on the brink of famine (IPC 4). Following early warning in February a quick response by donors, the humanitarian community and the Somali government and people, the worst has so far been averted via a combination of interventions – including cash transfers and livelihood support delivered by FAO at massive scale. April-June rains are critical to Somalia’s main Gu growing season and help rejuve nate rangelands. While they have now started, they started late and rainfall has been below average in many places. Meanwhile, displacement, disease (a severe outbreak of acute watery diarrhoea/cholera) and compounding needs are contributing to a further deterioration in food security.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    FAO in the 2021 humanitarian appeals
    Revised version
    2021
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    Levels of acute hunger soared throughout 2020, with the total number of people experiencing crisis or worse levels of acute food insecurity globally expected to far exceed 2019’s already staggeringly high figure of 135 million people. The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has further exacerbated pre-existing vulnerability due to intensifying conflict, historic flooding in some areas, an unprecedented desert locust upsurge, and economic crises. With or without famine declarations, some people are already dying of hunger. With the 2021 humanitarian appeal, FAO is highlighting the urgent need for funding which it will use to continue investing in the most vulnerable people and their livelihoods so that they can lead their future recovery and pull themselves out of acute hunger.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    FAO in the 2023 humanitarian appeals 2022
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    As 2022 nears an end, almost 1 million people face starvation – almost double the numbers of 2021. Across the world, 222 million people are experiencing high acute food insecurity, almost one in five of whom are struggling to access enough food to survive the day. They are overwhelmingly farmers, fishers, herders and foresters, whose most basic means of survival have been devastated by conflict or extreme weather (drought, floods), pests, disease or the steady disruption of economic turbulence and instability. Agriculture aid is life-saving humanitarian aid. Urgent, time-sensitive agricultural interventions, especially when combined with cash and food assistance, have enormous impacts on food availability, nutrition and displacement, among others, significantly cutting other humanitarian costs. More importantly, such interventions are geared towards meeting the needs and priorities of affected communities – allowing them to remain in their homes where it is safe to do so, meet their own needs and lead their own future recovery. Under the 2023 humanitarian appeals, FAO requires USD 1.9 billion to help almost 50 million people gain access to a steady supply of nutritious food, facilitate their recovery and lay the foundations for resilience to future shocks.

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