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From evidence to action: The story of cash transfers and impact evaluation in sub-Saharan Africa











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    Book (stand-alone)
    The household- and individual-level economic impacts of cash transfer programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa 2017
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    This report synthesizes the analysis and findings of a set of seven country impact evaluation studies that explore the impact of cash transfer programmes on household economic decision-making, productive activities and labour allocation in sub-Saharan Africa. The seven countries are Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Results from seven recently completed rigorous impact evaluations of government-run unconditional social cash transfer programmes in sub-Saharan Africa s how that these programmes have significant positive impacts on the livelihoods of beneficiary households. In Zambia, the Child Grant programme had large and positive impacts across an array of income generating activities. The impact of the programmes in Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi and Zimbabwe were more selective in nature, while the Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty programme in Ghana had fewer direct impacts on productive activities, and more on various dimensions of risk management .
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    Cash transfers: myths vs reality 2016
    Cash transfers have become a key social protection tool in developing countries and have expanded dramatically in the last two decades. Until now, much of the known evidence of the impacts of transfer programmes has been from conditional programmes implemented in Latin America; however, the impacts of programmes in sub-Saharan Africa, have not been substantially documented. The new FAO and UNICEF book "From Evidence to Action: The Story of Cash Transfers and Impact Evaluation in Sub-Saharan Afr ica" provides new evidence about the effectiveness of cash transfer programmes implemented in eight sub-Saharan African countries. This infographic provides an overview of the misconceptions about cash transfer programmes and how the evidence presented in the book proves them wrong. The evidence points to transformative impacts of such programmes in areas such as improved consumption, school attendance, health, food security, productive activities and agricultural investment. Social protection does not create dependency - a prevailing concern among policy makers – but it rather supports poor people in becoming more productive.
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    Qualitative research and analyses of the economic impacts of cash transfer programmes in sub-Saharan Africa: Ethiopia country case study report 2014
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    This report forms one of a set of six country case studies that explore the impact of cash transfer programmes on household economic decision-making and the local economy in sub-Saharan Africa. The research is being carried out under the auspices of the From Protection to Production (PtoP) project, a four-year collaboration between UNICEF, the United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). The PtoP is part of a larger effort, the T ransfer Project – jointly implemented by UNICEF, Save the Children and the University of North Carolina – that supports the implementation of cash transfer evaluations in sub-Saharan Africa. The research is intended as a complement to other studies of cash transfer programmes that focus more on social indicators such as health and education outcomes. It therefore covers themes such as the extent to which cash transfers can help households to manage risk, overcome credit constraints, make produc tive investments and improve their access to markets, as well as their effect in stimulating local economies. This report reviews the Tigray Social Cash Transfer Pilot programme. Case studies of cash transfer programmes in Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Zimbabwe and Malawi have been completed and are available at www.fao.org/economic/ptop/publications/reports.

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