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Ending child labour – The decisive role of agricultural stakeholders










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    Book (stand-alone)
    FAO Guidance Note: Child labour in agriculture in protracted crises, fragile and humanitarian contexts 2017
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    This note provides technical and operational guidance to stakeholders of the agriculture, food security and nutrition sector intervening in protracted crises, fragile and humanitarian contexts to ensure that children are not engaged in activities that could negatively affect their health, development or education, and are not employed in hazardous working conditions. It presents the basis to understand that agriculture, food security and nutrition programming in the aftermath of a crisis have po tentially both positive and negative effects on children. It also provides recommendations and concrete examples to address situations of child labour in agriculture in these contexts.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Engaging stakeholders to end child labour in agriculture
    E-learning fact sheet
    2020
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    This fact sheet describes the course that demonstrates how to carry out a stakeholder analysis to identify some of the relevant actors who can address child labour in farming, livestock, forestry and fisheries. It also provides suggestions on how to coordinate with these stakeholders in design, implementation and monitoring of initiatives that can contribute to the overall reduction of child labour in agriculture.
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    Booklet
    The role of international financial institutions and development banks in eliminating child labour in agriculture
    Background paper
    2021
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    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has estimated that achieving Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2 on zero hunger alone would require mobilizing an additional USD 265 billion per year in investments. It is also quite clear that reaching the SDGs, which are intrinsically interlinked, will require significantly more investments in agriculture, beyond SDG 2. Achieving sustainable benefits for all, however, requires not only increasing the volume of investments, but also their quality. The investments must be inclusive, responsible and more comprehensive, addressing economic, social and environmental risks under multiple SDGs through rigorous risk assessment tools and safeguard policies and measures. In the present paper, the strategies available to integrate child labour safeguards into agricultural investment programmes are explored, starting with a brief description of the main underlying drivers of child labour in agriculture.

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