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Evaluation of FAO’s Contribution to Integrated Natural Resource Management for Sustainable Agriculture (SO2) - Annex 1. Terms of Reference

Thematic evaluation - Annexes










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    Evaluation of FAO’s Contribution to Integrated Natural Resource Management for Sustainable Agriculture (SO2) 2018
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    The focus of Strategic Objective 2 stems from FAO’s vision for sustainable agriculture, which is at the heart of the 2030 Agenda. This evaluation assessed FAO’s efforts in promoting integrated approaches for making agriculture, forestry and fisheries more productive and sustainable. These efforts have proven to be highly relevant in countries where agriculture and food systems face urgent sustainability challenges. The Sustainable Food and Agriculture (SFA) principles, developed within the SO2 framework, have been instrumental in integrating key concepts of agricultural sustainability into FAO technical and programmatic work. To demonstrate the efficacy of the new approaches, FAO needs to further detail the new models, consolidate the progress achieved and transform these lessons learned into replicable best practices. FAO would also need to integrate analysis of potential trade-offs between sustainability and productivity in the new programmes, and strengthen global partnerships and alliances towards achievement of sustainable food and agriculture systems.
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    Evaluation of FAO’s Contribution to Integrated Natural Resource Management for Sustainable Agriculture (SO2) - Annex 2. Gender
    Thematic evaluation - Annexes
    2018
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    The focus of Strategic Objective 2 stems from FAO’s vision for sustainable agriculture, which is at the heart of the 2030 Agenda. This evaluation assessed FAO’s efforts in promoting integrated approaches for making agriculture, forestry and fisheries more productive and sustainable. These efforts have proven to be highly relevant in countries where agriculture and food systems face urgent sustainability challenges. The Sustainable Food and Agriculture (SFA) principles, developed within the SO2 framework, have been instrumental in integrating key concepts of agricultural sustainability into FAO technical and programmatic work. To demonstrate the efficacy of the new approaches, FAO needs to further detail the new models, consolidate the progress achieved and transform these lessons learned into replicable best practices. FAO would also need to integrate analysis of potential trade-offs between sustainability and productivity in the new programmes, and strengthen global partnerships and alliances towards achievement of sustainable food and agriculture systems.
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    Evaluation of FAO Strategic Objective 1: Contribute to the eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition - Annex 1. Terms of Reference
    Thematic evaluation - Annex
    2018
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    FAO’s Strategic Objective 1 (SO1) is to “contribute to the eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition”. The evaluation examined the value added of SO1 to FAO’s efforts to promote food and nutrition security at the global, regional, and national levels from 2014 to 2017. It concluded that SO1 was well designed, stressed the importance of political commitment to reduce hunger and malnutrition, promoted right-based approaches in FAO’s policy support and highlighted the need to work with ministries beyond agriculture, such as ministries of finance, health or education. FAO has also worked with various Parliamentary Fronts Against Hunger, local governments and municipalities. Regional economic cooperation organizations have also been an avenue of choice through the development of regional policies and legal frameworks, “model laws” and strategies on such topics as school feeding programmes, national investment in agriculture, or crop diversification. However, a high heterogeneity was observed in the approaches followed by FAO in different countries and regions under SO1, which reflected differences in context but also betrayed insufficient communication and training efforts within FAO itself. In particular, the most innovative aspects of SO1 need to be communicated to a greater extent, especially to FAO country offices so as to inform FAO’s activities at country level. The evaluation also found a proliferation of actors, policy initiatives, approaches, coordination spaces and knowledge products in food and nutrition security, sometimes leading to confusion and competition rather than building a critical mass for sustained progress. In this context, FAO could play a greater role in policy convergence and the synthesis of multiple data streams into narratives that make sense for decision-making.

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