Thumbnail Image

Climate-change vulnerability in rural Zambia: the impact of an El Niño-induced shock on income and productivity














Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Food security and adaptation impacts of potential climate smart agricultural practices in Zambia 2015
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This paper analyzes how a set of widely promoted agricultural practices, including reduced tillage, crop rotations, legume intercropping as well as the use of modern inputs, affect crop yields and their resilience (i.e. probability of disastrously low yields) in Zambia using panel data from the Rural Incomes and Livelihoods Surveys (RILS). The RILS data are merged with a novel set of climatic variables based on geo-referenced historical rainfall and temperature data to understand whether and how the effects of the practices analyzed here change with climatic conditions. We estimate the impacts on the level of maize yields and the probability of very low yields controlling for time-invariant unobservable household characteristics. We find no significant impact of minimum soil disturbance, positive impact of legume intercropping and a negative impact of crop rotation on maize yields, which is off-set by a significantly positive impact under highly variable rainfall conditions. We also fi nd that the average positive impacts of modern input use are conditioned by climatic variables, whereas that of legume intercropping is robust to shocks. Timely access to fertilizer is the most robust determinant of yields and resilience. This paper provides important insights into the interplay between food security outcomes and climatic variables, and provides policy implications for targeted interventions to improve the productivity and the resilience of smallholder agriculture in Zambia in t he face of climate change.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Food security and adaptation impacts of potential climate smart agricultural practices in Zambia 2014
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This paper analyzes how a set of widely promoted agricultural practices, including reduced tillage, crop rotations, legume intercropping as well as the use of modern inputs, affect crop yields and their resilience (i.e. probability of disastrously low yields) in Zambia using panel data from the Rural Incomes and Livelihoods Surveys (RILS). The RILS data are merged with a novel set of climatic variables based on geo-referenced historical rainfall and temperature data to understand whether and how the effects of the practices analyzed here change with climatic conditions. We estimate the impacts on the level of maize yields and the probability of very low yields controlling for time-invariant unobservable household characteristics. We find no significant impact of minimum soil disturbance, positive impact of legume intercropping and a negative impact of crop rotation on maize yields, which is off-set by a significantly positive impact under highly variable rainfall conditions. We also fi nd that the average positive impacts of modern input use are conditioned by climatic variables, whereas that of legume intercropping is robust to shocks. Timely access to fertilizer is the most robust determinant of yields and resilience. This paper provides important insights into the interplay between food security outcomes and climatic variables, and provides policy implications for targeted interventions to improve the productivity and the resilience of smallholder agriculture in Zambia in t he face of climate change.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Emergency Assistance to Mitigate the Impact of El Niño-Induced Drought on Livelihoods of Vulnerable Agricultural and Agropastoral Households in Zambia - TCP/ZAM/3703 2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The agriculture sector in Zambia supports the livelihoods of nearly 85 percent of the population, which includes 17 million people located across three agroecological zones. The sector is currently facing an increasing number of hazards, such as recurrent dry spells, floods and pest insurgences, which affect crops and livestock of economic importance. The effects of drought, in particular, are being exacerbated by increased occurrences of El Niño weather patterns. Moreover, drier conditions are likely to lead to increased insurgences of pests, such as the fall armyworm (FAW), and cases of livestock disease. Prior to the project, the 2018/19 National Contingency Plan, which was jointly developed by the Government, UN agencies and non-governmental organizations, estimated that 609 608 agriculture-dependent households would be affected by extreme weather conditions, with around 280 000 people requiring food assistance. The affected population would also require emergency assistance that enables them to engage in agricultural activities to rebuild their livelihoods. To mitigate the effects of El Niño-induced drought in Zambia, the project sought not only to protect existing livelihood assets, including crops and livestock, against potential threats, but also promote agricultural practices and effective surveillance measures that support production.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.