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Building durable solutions for refugees and host communities through inclusive value chain development in Uganda

A comprehensive agricultural livelihoods approach in Kiryandongo Refugee Settlement









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Building evidence on agricultural value chains interventions in refugee settings
    Baseline analysis in Uganda
    2023
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    This baseline report examines the Refugee Agricultural Value Chains for Economic Self-reliance (RAVES) project in Uganda. The programme adopts an innovative approach, with a focus on providing sustainable long-term solutions beyond humanitarian assistance that mitigate the negative effects of displacement, uplift refugees, and support host communities. The approach allows the refugees to contribute to the economy of the host community without creating social tension. The project supports both refugee and host communities to engage in high value crop value chains, linking them to private sector actors. This baseline report focuses on Uganda and is implemented in Kiryandongo district among both refugees and host communities. The district is predominantly agriculture based and has the biophysical conditions suitable for growing passion fruit. Our analysis suggests that the randomization between treatment and control was fully successful in host communities but less so in the refugees’ settlements. The variations we find between host communities and refugees’ settlements when it comes to demographics, food security, endowment of land and constraints in agricultural production hint towards large structural differences between the two groups. This calls for tailored approaches such as a gender-specific one to address the two communities' specific obstacles to participation in commercial value chains.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Assessment of Forest Resource Degradation and Intervention Options in Refugee-Hosting Areas of Western and Southwestern Uganda 2020
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    Uganda is currently hosting over 1.3 million refugees making it the largest refugee host country in Africa. The inflow of refugees is reported to have exacerbated a range of ongoing environmental impacts and associated challenges, including land degradation and woodland loss, resulting in inadequate access to energy for cooking and competition with local people for water and other natural resources. Supporting more sustainable use of those resources, especially forests and other woodlands, could help address environmental degradation and improve energy access. Building on a 2018 assessment of natural resource degradation in the refugee-hosting areas of northern Uganda, FAO, in collaboration with the World Bank and the Government of Uganda, has undertaken a follow-on assessment of forest resource degradation in the refugee hosting areas in the west and southwest of the country. The study identifies potential intervention options to mitigate pressure on forest resources, restore degraded land, enhance sustainable woodfuel supply and contribute to resilience-building of both the displaced and host communities. The findings of this study will add to the evidence base for the World Bank/Government of Uganda (GoU) investment package ‘Investing in Forests and Protected Areas for Climate-smart Development project’, to be supported under the Refugee Sub-Window of the International Development Association’s 18th and 19th funding rounds. It is envisaged that the study findings will also guide the support of different development partners for programming energy and environment interventions in the forced displacement context.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Vegetable and staple food production in refugee settlements in northern and midwestern Uganda 2017
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    Uganda lies almost completely within the Nile Basin. It has monomodal and bi-modal rainfall patterns, that is, one rainy season and two rainy seasons, respectively. Its vulnerability to climate change, especially poor rainfall and long dry spells in the northern region, is affecting food security. The influx of refugees has exacerbated these challenges. Hunger, conflict and insecurity have uprooted many people from neighbouring Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Rwanda, Somalia and South Sudan over an extended period. Uganda is now the largest refugee-hosting country in Africa, with almost 1.4 million refugees. Over 1 million are South Sudanese, 80 percent of whom are women and children under 18 years. This large influx of South Sudanese refugees constitutes a major challenge across all sectors. It has created a substantial increase in the demand for food, including affordable sources of protein such as meat and eggs. The impact on the agriculture sector is particularl y worrying as this is the main source of income and livelihoods for many rural communities in the hosting districts, especially the poorest and most vulnerable communities. FAO, in collaboration with resource and implementing partners, began coordinating interventions in 2012 in some refugee settlements to address the emergency food and nutrition security and livelihood concerns of South Sudanese refugees. It provided planting materials and inputs for small-scale vegetable, staple food and poult ry production, along with training in entrepreneurship and animal husbandry practices. The initiative, scaled up in 2014, aimed to improve the food, nutrition and income security of both refugees and host communities.

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