Thumbnail Image

Achieving SDG 2 without breaching the 1.5 °C threshold: A global roadmap, Part 1

How agrifood systems transformation through accelerated climate actions will help achieving food security and nutrition, today and tomorrow, In brief








Read online the interactive story


FAO. 2023. Achieving SDG 2 without breaching the 1.5 °C threshold: A global roadmap, Part 1 – How agrifood systems transformation through accelerated climate actions will help achieving food security and nutrition, today and tomorrow, In brief. Rome.



Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Meeting
    Update on the development of the new FAO Strategy on Climate Change
    Thirty-session Session of the FAO Regional Conference for Asia and the Pacific (APRC 36)
    2022
    The need to address climate change impacts in agri-food systems has never been clearer. In the face of increasing extreme climate events around the globe, including extreme precipitation, heatwaves and droughts, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Sixth Assessment Report “Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Basis” warns of unequivocal, unprecedented, irreversible trends which increasingly put the planet and humanity in peril. Urgent action is required now by all nations if we are to keep warming within 2 ºC or, if still possible, within 1.5 ºC. At the same time, we need to make our systems resilient to the climate changes that are already unavoidable in coming years. Action at global, regional, national and local levels in agri-food systems, including in crops, livestock, forests, fisheries and related value chains, is a fundamental component of climate action because agri-food systems are heavily affected by climate change and at the same time, could be responsible for 21-37 percent of all greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (IPCC). FAO needs to strengthen its contribution to the global climate agenda and support countries in transforming their agri-food systems, to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including eradication of hunger. The implementation of the existing FAO Strategy on Climate Change (2017) and FAO’s general contribution to climate action (SDG 13) were subject to an evaluation whose recommendations were approved at the 166th Session of the Council. As per Recommendation 2 of the Evaluation, the development of a new FAO Strategy on Climate Change has been launched and an informal consultation with Members was organized on 8 September 2021, where they reiterated the urgency to act and confirmed their commitment to the Strategy development process. The development of the new Strategy will be a stepwise process building on the 2017 FAO Strategy on Climate Change and the latest scientific evidence. It will include a Theory of Change to take FAO climate action beyond ‘business as usual’.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Special event of the FAO Science and Innovation Forum - Food Loss and Waste reduction: how can we better integrate science and innovation in our actions?
    19 October 2022, 11:00 - 12:45
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Significant levels of food loss and waste (FLW) occur in the food supply chain from production to consumption. Globally, up to 14 percent of food produced for human consumption is lost from harvest up to but excluding retail, while 17 percent is wasted at the retail and consumer stages. FLW have negative impacts on food security and nutrition, occurring within a context where some 828 million people in the world are undernourished and 3.1 billion cannot afford a healthy diet. FLW contribute significantly to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, to environmental pollution, degradation of natural ecosystems and biodiversity loss, and represent a waste of the resources used in food production, such as energy, water and land. Reducing FLW helps address the challenge of promoting economic prosperity and sustainably feeding a world population projected to reach almost 10 billion in 2050, without accentuating pressure on the environment and the natural resources underpinning the agri-food system. Science and context-specific innovations are critical to catalyse, support and accelerate the transformation of agri-food systems to improve their efficiency, sustainability, inclusiveness and resilience, thereby leading to FLW reduction and contributing to the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Innovations in this context include innovations in the policy, regulatory and institutional framework, as well as innovations in technologies, social and market relationships, finance products and business models that contribute to reducing FLW in a sustainable way (economically, socially and environmentally). On the other hand, science generates new insights and the basis for these innovations, while also serving to identify targets and actions for pathways towards reaching those targets. We need to capitalize on scientific and technological advancements to transform agri-food systems to be more efficient, resilient, sustainable and inclusive, leaving no one behind. Organized within the framework of FAO Science & Innovation Forum 2022, this event will gather perspectives and experiences from stakeholders from different parts of the world regarding applying science and leveraging innovation to sustainably reduce food loss and waste (FLW). The event will also discuss possible response options and make concrete recommendations to achieve lower levels of FLW at scale within a sustainable agri-food systems context.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Asia and the Pacific - Regional Overview of Food Security and Nutrition 2023
    Statistics and Trends
    2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This digital report is an update on the statistics and trends of the fifth edition of the Asia and the Pacific Regional Overview of Food Security and Nutrition annual report published by FAO’s Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (RAP). It reports on the region’s latest food security and nutrition situation highlighting progress (or lack thereof) on achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (in particular SDG 2 – Ending Hunger) and the World Health Assembly (WHA) 2030 targets on food security and nutrition. The latest statistics indicate that the region, with 370.7 million undernourished people, continues to represent half of the world’s figure. Similarly, the Asia and the Pacific region accounts for half of the world’s severe food insecurity, with more women than men being food-insecure. Prevalence rates on stunting, wasting and overweight among children under 5 years of age, as well as anaemia among women of reproductive age, are still off the marks in terms of World Health Assembly global nutrition targets. In 2021, the average cost of a healthy diet in Asia and the Pacific was estimated at 4.15 PPP dollars per person per day, representing a 5.3 percent increase in the cost of healthy diet, from 3.94 PPP dollars in 2020. It is estimated that in 2021, 232.8 million people in the region could not afford the cost of a healthy diet. These statistics reaffirm the need for whole-of-government, well-coordinated and integrated actions and investments towards agrifood systems transformation if we are to turn the tide and put the countries back on track to meeting the 2030 SDG agenda.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.