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Play more, live better! Using sustainable wildlife management games to help adults and children collaborate and solve complex problems together









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    Booklet
    Kwinda Nyama: A multiplayer hunting game for social learning and sustainable use 2024
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    Games can help people learn about complex issues, make choices and adapt their actions as they observe the consequences of their choices. They allow adults and children to explore, safely, different scenarios that can generate a variety of outcomes depending on the choices they make as they play the game. Therefore, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) with support from the SWM Programme, developed this low-tech, multiplayer decision-making game to play with rural communities in the Republic of the Congo and in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This Manual explains the rules and materials needed to play the Kwinda Nyama game which tests players’ responses to different hunting scenarios with different rules. The SWM Programme is a major international initiative that aims to improve the conservation and sustainable use of wildlife in forest, savannah and wetland ecosystems. It is being funded by the European Union with co-funding from the French Facility for Global Environment (FFEM) and the French Development Agency (AFD). Projects are being piloted and tested with governments and communities in 17 participating countries. The initiative is coordinated by a dynamic consortium of four partners, namely the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Center for International Forestry Research and World Agroforestry (CIFOR-ICRAF), the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).
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    Booklet
    Human–wildlife conflict role-playing game
    User guide
    2023
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    The Sustainable Wildlife Management (SWM) Programme in Zimbabwe created role-playing games especially for use in Farmer Field Schools. Their primary aim is to learn about human–wildlife conflict (HWC) scenarios alongside the farmers who are most impacted by them. Role-playing games have a lot of potential, especially when the training’s performance objectives involve complex problem-solving. Participants in these games do not just observe; they actively participate in simulations that require group decision-making and interaction. The SWM Programme is funded by the European Union with co-funding from the French Facility for Global Environment (FFEM) and the French Development Agency (AFD). The initiative is coordinated by a dynamic consortium of four partners, namely the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Center for International Forestry Research and World Agroforestry (CIFOR-ICRAF), the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Social Protection, Resilience and Climate Change - A new learning tool 2017
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    FAO, in partnership with the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre, is developing an interactive learning tool to facilitate learning on the potential benefits and trade-offs in linking social protection, resilience and climate change policies at local, national and global level. The tool allows national stakeholders and policymakers to experience first-hand the challenges that smallholder farmers face when dealing with scarce availability of productive assets and deteriorating climate conditio ns. This will help participants be better equipped to solve complex problems related to social protection, climate change issues and resilience in an uncertain world. The tool capture the essence of real-life complexity simulating struggles and threats faced by smallholder farmers. It forces participants to make decisions that will have consequences; and with that exploration of possibilities comes very deep learning which is owned by those who play the game.

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