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Preserving green leafy vegetables and fruits








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    Promoting sustainable and inclusive value chains for fruits and vegetables - Policy review
    Background paper for the FAO/WHO International Workshop on Fruits and Vegetables 2020
    2021
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    The persistence of undernutrition and the increasing levels of overweight and obesity worldwide (with their associated societal costs) are calling for a transformation of food systems towards healthier diets. Fruits and vegetables are key components of a healthy diet; however, their consumption is considerably below the minimal levels recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). This underconsumption is particularly pronounced in low- and middle-income countries and among low-income socio-economic groups in all countries. This paper uses the value chain approach to analyze the factors that affect the availability and affordability of fruits and vegetables. It examines major challenges across the value chain and identifies opportunities for improvement as seen through a nutrition-sensitive lens. Factors that negatively affect the availability and affordability of fruits and vegetables discussed in this paper include low production and productivity, the loss of agrobiodiversity, inadequate technology, logistics and infrastructure, weak organizational, business, and technical skills, and inefficient market linkages across the supply chain. The paper proposes a number of policy recommendations based on insights from documented cases of good practices and on lessons learned in domestic and export-oriented value chains. The paper makes a case for reviving native, underutilized, and neglected fruit and vegetable varieties to improve nutrition and increase agrobiodiversity. In addition, short value chains delivering to local markets are recommended as a resilience strategy for smallscale producers and low-income consumers in the face of climatic and economic shocks.
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    Handling and preservation of fruits and vegetables by combined methods for rural areas
    Technical Manual
    2003
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    This manual is intended to surve as a guide to farmers and processors of fruits and vegetables in rural areas. It contains basic but valuable information on post-harvest handling and marketing operations and storage of fresh and processed products. It provides practical examples of preserving fruits and vegetables addressing a combination of factors, highlighting technology which, when combined, has a positive and synergistic effect in preventing biochemical and physiochemical reactions and micr obial growth - the main causes of quality losses in fruits and vegetables. The suggested methodologies combine technologies such as mild heat treatment, water activity reduction (aw), lowering of the pH and use of anti-microbial substances to realize the potential of minimally processed, high-moisture fruit products. These relatively new technologies have been successfully applied to several important tropical and non-tropical fruits in different countries of Latin America and are considered app ropriate and recommended for use in other fruit-producing countries around the world.
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    Book (series)
    Evaluation of the "Food-loss reduction through improved postharvest handling and value-addition of key fruits and vegetables" project in Ethiopia
    Project code: GCP/ETH/088/GER
    2021
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    The “Food-loss reduction through improved postharvest handling and value addition of key fruits and vegetables” project was implemented by FAO Ethiopia over the period 2016–2019. By tackling post-harvest losses, the project addressed one of the major challenges faced by producers. Farmers have adopted project post-harvest management practices, techniques and technologies that have helped to reduce losses and increase food security by boosting income and making more produce available for household consumption. The results will be sustainable because of the economic gains the farmers are seeing and the adaptability of practices and technologies. Studies conducted as part of the project provided evidence of the size and significance of post-harvest losses, which were previously undocumented. Evidence produced contributed to increase institutional attention on post-harvest management.

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