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Forests and trees supporting rural livelihoods











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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Forest and Farm Facility. Country factsheet
    Viet Nam
    2018
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    This factsheet gives some highlights of the impact of FFF support in Viet Nam, as well as some achievements by the numbers, and some lessons learnt. Summary of the impact in Viet Nam: Seven value chains quickly advanced by local Forest and Farm Producer Organizations (FFPOs) supported by the Forest and Farm Facility (FFF) in tree nurseries, acacia and magnolia timber, cinnamon products, star anise oil, tea, pomelo and forest chickens. Collective action by FFPOs allowed them to achieve more: investing in business and production techniques, creating better value products, increasing markets and information, achieving better prices, signing contracts with companies and traders, gaining a stronger voice with local authorities.
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    Document
    Small-scale timber plantations for rural household livelihoods: Case study of Acacia timber production and commercialization system in central Vietnam
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Rural poverty alleviation implies economic development at local levels to which forests contribute to different extents. Smallholder-managed timber plantations form the backbone of wood supply in Vietnam. Of the planted tree species, Acacia (Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium) hybrid is one of the most preferred by timber growers. Yet, the contribution of these timber plantations to rural livelihoods is currently unknown.
    This study explores the impacts of Acacia timber production and trade on rural livelihoods in Thua Thien Hue province, where the tree species has been cultivated widely since approximately 20 years. 300 household heads in Nam Dong and Phu Loc district were interviewed, following a stratified random sampling approach. We employed a combination of descriptive and inferential statistics to examine the contribution of Acacia hybrid timber income to household economies. In addition, three Foster-Greer-Thorbecke poverty measures and the Gini decomposition method were used to evaluate the effects of income from timber plantations on poverty and income inequality. The findings were validated in group discussions, key informant interviews and direct observations.
    The results demonstrated that Acacia hybrid timber plantations accounted for 33-56% of total annual household income. However, more wealthy households benefitted more from Acacia timber income especially in case of a well-developed market. Livelihood diversification using timber production notably reduced all three poverty indices in both districts. Given its highest share of total Gini and positive marginal effect on total Gini, Acacia timber income was the main contributor to the overall income inequality. While this income source reduced the Gini coefficient by 0.7% in Nam Dong, it increased Gini coefficient by 18% in Phu Loc district. Recommendations refer to improving the contribution of Acacia hybrid timber plantations to rural livelihoods. Keywords: Human health and well-being, Sustainable forest management, Landscape management, Governance, Deforestation and forest degradation ID: 3477875
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    Article
    Covid 19 – How forestry can respond to a pandemic- An example from Indonesia
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Since the beginning of 2020, the world has been firmly in the grip of the Covid-19 virus. In Indonesia, the first patient was reported in early March 2020. The subsequent restrictions imposed to prevent the spread of the virus affect the daily lives of all people. Apart from the health sector, some areas of the economic sector are being hit hard. Forest Program III - Sulawesi (FP III) used its presence in Central Sulawesi for additional efforts to reduce the economic impacts of the pandemic for the local communes. Central Sulawesi is one of the ten poorest provinces in Indonesia; according to the official statistic data (BPJS; 04/2021) in the province the percentage of people in poverty increased from 10% (12/2019) to 15% (12/2020). FP III provided funds for the planting of fast-growing species (gmelina sp, moringa sp., musaseae sp. etc.) and herbals (ginger, turmeric, etc.). Following project`s approach, the villagers received financial incentives (US$ 0,14/seedling planted) after the planting was carried out. In the meantime, farmers have long since harvested herbals and fruits. With this activity, carried out specifically to contribute to the Covid-19 pandemic response, farmers have made a positive contribution to the environment and health in many ways. The planting of fast-growing species improves the soil nutrients, creates a microclimate, reduces the risk of erosion, and enhances genetic conservation efforts. In addition, the planting of the selected species rapidly contributes to the health (nutrition) and improves the economic situation of the population trough the payment of incentives and because people have additional products to sell on the market) In total, FP III supported the planting of 207,211 fast-growing tree species and 64,606 herbals. The planting was conducted between June and August 2020. Conclusion: This fast reaction on the impacts of the pandemic turns out as a win-win solution for all beneficiaries and contributes to a better environment. Keywords: Covid-19, Health, Livelihood, Economy, Ecology ID: 3485647

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