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The right to adequate food and decent rural employment: joining forces










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Linkages between the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries and the Voluntary Guidelines to Support the Progressive Realization of the Right to Adequate Food 2020
    Both the CFS Voluntary Guidelines to Support the Progressive Realization of the Right to Adequate Food in the Context of National Food Security (Right to Food Guidelines) and the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines) hold the realization of the right to adequate food as their main objective. The Right to Food Guidelines emphasizes the role of small-scale producers in several sections and the SSF Guidelines as their first objective call “to enhance the contribution to fisheries to food security and nutrition and support the realization to the right to adequate food”. This brief is part of a series drawing attention to the mutually reinforcing nature of four global normative instruments developed through the Committee on World Food Security (CFS) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) SSF Guidelines. The four CFS instruments with direct links to the SSF Guidelines are the CFS Voluntary Guidelines to Support the Progressive Realization of the Right to Adequate Food in the Context of National Food Security (Right to Food Guidelines), the CFS Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (VGGT), the CFS Principles for Responsible Investment in Agriculture and Food Systems (CFS-RAI Principles) and the CFS Framework for Action for Food Security and Nutrition in Protracted Crisis (CFS-FFA). Their synergistic implementation can make a difference in enabling small-scale fisheries to contribute to sustainable food systems by providing highly nutritious food for local communities, and it can make a difference for consumers in national, regional, and international markets. The briefs aim at highlighting key commonalities among these CFS instruments and the SSF Guidelines, and provide some illustrative examples to inspire action by all, including by governments, small-scale fisheries organizations or other civil society organizations, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, and research and development partners.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Vigo Dialogue on benefits of decent employment in fisheries and aquaculture
    Working for blue growth: Social responsibility in the fish business – a win-win situation for all. Vigo, Spain, 9 October 2015
    2017
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    As a side event to the First International Fisheries Stakeholder Forum, FAO convened on 9 October 2015, the Vigo Dialogue on the Benefits of promoting decent employment in fisheries and aquaculture. Working for Blue Growth: Social responsibility in the fish business – a win-win situation for all. Stakeholder representatives in fisheries and aquaculture including government administrations, private sector industries, civil society organizations (small-scale fishers, workers’ unions), auditing/certification initiatives and international organizations discussed priority issues and actions on labour conditions in the sector (including capture fisheries, aquaculture, fish processing, distribution, fish trade), however with major emphasis on benefits and incentives of addressing those issues for different stakeholders, e.g. better reputation for companies, more efficiency in production and operation, improved conditions for producers/workers, etc. The meeting recognized that promoting decent working conditions has become a central issue for sustainable business development and agreed that abuses of human rights and labour rights often coincide with illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. Ensuring social responsibility in the seafood industry reduces the risks of poor image and bad reputation for companies and improves labour relations and workers’ commitment to company operations and business. Seafood industry and retailers emphasized their interest in advancing decent working conditions in seafood supply chains through social and labour standards and certifications schemes. Capacity development, institution building, strengthening of fish workers organizations along with investments in training, skills development and occupational safety and health were identified as important entry points to achieve decent working conditions in fish value chains. Governments should widely ratify the ILO Work in fishing convention, 2007 (No.188) - as a matter of high priority – and ensure protection of migrant and foreign workers, who often are lacking legal protection.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Guidance on how to address decent rural employment in FAO country activities
    Guidance material 1
    2010
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    This guidance document will: Introduce the concepts of rural employment and decent work (RE&DW). Acknowledge the centrality of RE&DW for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)• Affirm FAO’s comparative advantages in dealing with RE&DW and identify the main areas of intervention • Provide a summary of the results of FAO’s “Self-Assessment on Employment and Decent Workâ€Â • Suggest examples of concrete actions that FAO country offices could consider to promote RE&DW w ithin their existing work programmes • Encourage the creation of links with International Labour Organization (ILO) field offices and facilitate partnerships and the identification of synergies.

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