Thumbnail Image

Oceans Day at Copenhagen: The Importance of Oceans, Coasts, and Small Island Developing States in the Climate Regime

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 15th Conference of the Parties Copenhagen, Denmark December 7-18, 2009








Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    African Package for Climate-Resilient Ocean Economies 2016
    Emerging from calls at September’s African Ministerial Conference on Ocean Economies and Climate Change in Mauritius, the African Package for Climate-resilient Blue Economies (“the Package”) responds to a request that the World Bank (WB), The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, and the African Development Bank (AfDB) present a proposal at COP 22 in Marrakesh, Morocco. The Package consists of technical and financial assistance to support coastal and island states in Afr ica to take the challenges of climate change as they develop their ocean-based economies and implement their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).
  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    Not a drop in the ocean
    Key successes Common Oceans ABNJ Program 2014-2019
    2021
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Oceans are essential to life on earth. They help regulate our climate and produce oxygen for us to breathe. They also provide food, jobs, energy and transport for millions of people around the world. Yet, our oceans are in peril. Overfishing, pollution and climate change are some of the threats facing the marine environment, as well as the supply of goods and services oceans provide to humankind. The need to protect the oceans is gaining momentum on the international agenda and global action is being taken, targeting even the ocean’s remotest parts, known as the areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) – which cover over 60 percent of the ocean’s surface and 40 percent of the planet’s surface. Far from land, outside national boundaries, the complex management of the rich marine resources and biodiversity of the ABNJ requires international cooperation. This has improved since the UN Convention for the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) was adopted in 1982. Nevertheless, challenges remain to achieve the responsible and sustainable use of these important ecosystems. To contribute to meet these goals, the Common Oceans ABNJ Program brought together global stakeholders and partners to promote the sustainable use of fisheries and the protection of marine biodiversity in the ABNJ. The Program, funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and led by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), involved the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Bank Group (WBG), as well as Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs) and other intergovernmental organizations, national governments, the private sector, civil society and academia. This report presents the results obtained by the Common Oceans ABNJ Program between 2014-2019. It highlights the value, importance and benefits of sustainably managing fisheries and biodiversity conservation in the ABNJ, and how the collateral impact of fishing is less harmful to the marine environment now than when the program started out in 2014.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Policy brief
    The Indonesian Seas Large Marine Ecosystem Strategic Action Programme
    A brief
    2024
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Indonesian Seas Large Marine Ecosystem is a region shared by Indonesia (98 percent) and north coast of Timor-Leste (2 percent). Characterized by warm surface temperature and the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) that contribute to climate regulation, the region is a hub of mega biodiversity with unique habitats and ecosystems that offer high fisheries productivities and various other valuable ecosystem goods and services. The region has been instrumental to ensure nutrition, livelihood and coastal communities wellbeing. However, increasing fishing pressures, human and economic activities have threatened the sustainability of the region’s resources. Through the FAO/GEF-supported ISLME project, Indonesia and Timor-Leste formulated the Strategic Action Programme (SAP) in close collaboration with national fisheries and marine experts and stakeholders. The SAP is a follow-up of the Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis (TDA), an intensive, scientific causal chain analysis leading to the identification of the five Primary Environmental Concerns (PECs) to the region sustainability. With a vision to sustainable fisheries and healthy ocean in the ISLME area, providing ecosystem benefits for the long-term prosperity of the communities, the SAP aims to achieve three goals: ecosystem wellbeing, good governance and human wellbeing. The SAP’s five priority action plans are namely: (i) maintaining sustainable fisheries, (ii) restoring marine habitat biodiversity, (iii) reducing marine pollution, (iv) conserving ETP and other key marine species; and (v) responding to impacts of climate change. Each action. These are further elaborated into National Action Plans (NAPs), consisting 63 action plans for Indonesia, 25 action plans for Timor-Leste and 97 common action plans with an estimated total investment of USD 49 million over a five-year-period.The SAP, endorsed by both governments in January 2024, sets concrete timeframe, targets to achieve and the actors for each action plan initiative; and risks and management strategies to guide efforts towards sustainability.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.