Thumbnail Image

Are African high-value horticulture supply chains bearers of gender inequality?









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    A species-specific approach for tracing Brazilian timber origins and associated illegality risks across the supply-chain
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The rise in global demand for agricultural and forest commodities have created unparalleled pressure on forests, leading to loss of carbon, biodiversity, ecosystems services, and livelihoods. While we know more about how commodity production and trade is linked to deforestation, such connection still largely unexplored for forest degradation despite the threat rivaling or exceeding that of deforestation. Timber extraction is the largest direct anthropic driver of forest degradation and its illegal share a pervasive source across domestic and international markets. Here we seek to lay the foundations for connecting localities of production to consumption, presenting a species- specific approach to quantifying sources of illegality risk across the supply chain. By adapting material flow analyses and environmentally extended input-output models to timber originating from Brazilian native forests, we demonstrate how distinct risks can be mapped and quantified. We focus on the Amazon state of Pará; a leading producer of timber, of high-value ipê, and contested forest frontier. Data on logging permits and state-level Document of Forest Origin are used to estimate sources of illegality risk associated with overstated ipê yields, unclear forest of origin and discrepancies resulting from missing physical flows. We find that less than one fourth of all ipê volume entering supply-chains in 2017-2019 is risk-free. The area explored under logging permits and volumes entering the supply chain suggest an average yield of 1.6 m3ha-1, which exceeds the 90% percentile of reported ipê tree densities for region. Nearly a third of supply-chain flows cannot be accounted for by Pará’s state-level system. Despite important limitations to this study, it puts forward an approach that can be refined and leveraged to monitor illegally logged timber entry- points and can contribute to increased transparency in Brazilian timber supply chains. Keywords: timber illegality, forest-risk commodity, environmentally-extended input-output models, Handroanthus spp., Brazilian Amazon
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Report of the Third Expert Meeting on Socially and Environmentally Responsible Horticulture Production and Trade
    Theme: Building partnerships for responsible trade
    2003
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Third Expert Meeting on Socially and Environmentally Responsible Horticulture Production and Trade was held in Nuremberg, 16 February 2003. Various representatives of standard setting and certification bodies, as well as producers and traders of fresh produce presented their experiences and opinion on the theme of the meeting: "Building partnerships for socially and environmentally responsible horticultural trade". In the afternoon discussions were held in three groups. The debate on "buil ding partnerships" concentrated on the responsibilities of the actors in the supply chain and the need for transparency. It was felt that small farmers should organize to increase their marketing and bargaining powers and to be able to create partnerships with market operators on a more equal level. Both the costs and the value addition associated with social and environmental improvements should be distributed in a fair way among the parties. The debate on responsible pricing concentrated on the transparency of price building along the supply chain, especially on the part of the retailers. Such transparency would facilitate negotiations of fair prices. The group saw no evidence that price guarantees to cover the cost of production would stimulate overproduction, as low prices have often triggered increased output. The debate on the role of certification in partnerships concentrated on the role of certification bodies beyond verification. It was recommended that the certification bodies organize open training sessions and provide more information on buyer and consumer requirements. Certification bodies could help to evaluate the certification systems by sharing their experiences in standard implementation with accreditation agencies, producers and consumers.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Evaluation of the project “The Horticulture Advancement Activity” in Pakistan
    Project code: GCP/PAK/144/USA
    2024
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The Horticulture Advancement Activity (THAzA) project is a 4.5-year project in Pakistan with an overall goal of “improved and increased access to on-farm and off-farm livelihood opportunities, leading to sustainable economic growth”. THAzA focused efforts in ten districts of Balochistan and four districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa to enhance competitiveness of priority horticultural value chains, creating increased jobs and income opportunities. The project implemented 1 597 grants (1 545 production level and 52 high-value grants). Through strengthening commercial horticulture value chains and creating increased jobs and income opportunities, THAzA has contributed to the overall agribusiness development of the target districts. The project design was highly ambitious given the extremely challenging operational environment and FAO Pakistan’s first attempt at implementation through matching grants. There were multiple delays through start-up challenges, complex procurement processes, and the COVID-19 pandemic. The inclusion of women grantees is noteworthy, with elevated social status at both household and community levels and increased ability to contribute to household income through small agribusiness enterprises.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.