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Kazakhstan and FAO

Partnering to achieve sustainable livelihoods and food security









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    Booklet
    Overview of food security and nutrition in Kazakhstan 2021
    Progress towards the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals
    2022
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    This report is prepared by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Coalition for Green Economy and Development of G-Global in Kazakhstan under the Technical Support Programme Facility (TCPF) project “Supporting the nationalization of Sustainable Development Goals in Kazakhstan” (TCP/KAZ/3702) with the aim to present an overview of food security and nutrition situation in Kazakhstan. The analysis provided in the report is based on the latest data from the State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World (SOFI) and the Bureau of National Statistics in Kazakhstan.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Guidelines on the Implementation of Nature-based Solutions (NbS) to Combat the Negative Impact of Climate Change on Forestry
    Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Türkiye, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan
    2023
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    Climate change is one of the most critical social and environmental concerns and the biggest threat to economic stability in human history. Türkiye, Azerbaijan, and Central Asia countries, namely Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, are vulnerable to the negative impacts of climate change. Although average forest cover is only 10.2 percent of these countries (FAO-SEC countries), they play an essential role in climate change mitigation and adaptation, including human well-being and biodiversity co-benefits. The NbS concept has gained attention since the late 2000s. Its practical contribution to global climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts has found significant implementation opportunities in forestry to support the protection and conservation, restoration and expansion, and sustainable management of forests under the impact of climate change. Globally, implementing NbSs to combat the negative impact of climate change on forestry is promoted by the United Nations Forum on Forests (UNFF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), the Paris Agreement, United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), The United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat), and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Regionally, implementing NbSs to combat the negative impacts of climate change on forestry has been included in the forest policy initiatives of the countries in the sub-region recently. As a result, governments have implemented NbSs through national strategies and programs to address societal challenges by enhancing ecosystem services and promoting human well-being and biodiversity co-benefits. For example, Azerbaijan has implemented afforestation, reforestation, rehabilitation, and restoration activities in forest fund lands on an average of 9 727 hectares (ha) annually since 2000. Kazakhstan aims to save the Aral Sea basin from salinity and improve soil fertility through afforestation activities of saxaul species on 0.25 million ha, and the afforestation area in the Aral Sea will be extended by 1 million ha till 2025. Kyrgyzstan has planned a 1,000-ha annual plantation program to expand protected natural areas to 10 percent. Tajikistan implements 2,000 ha of annual plantation activities to increase the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential through participatory forestry sector development. Türkiye implemented afforestation, soil conservation, forest rehabilitation, pasture rehabilitation, private afforestation, artificial regeneration, and establishment of energy forests activities on 9.62 million ha from 1946 to 2022. Turkmenistan conducts afforestation activities with drought-resistant plant species and established the "Golden Century Lake" in the Karakum Desert to improve the climate conditions and conserve biodiversity. Uzbekistan declared the Aral Sea region
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    Document
    Bhutan and FAO: Achievements and Success Stories 2011
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    In recent years, Bhutan has made steady progress toward meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Poverty has been substantially reduced from 32 to 23 percent during a short span of four years (2004-2007). Life expectancy has steadily increased, from 47 years in 1985 to 66 years in 2005. Bhutan experienced a successful and smooth transition to democracy in 2008. Bhutan’s economy grew an average of 8.75 percent a year in real terms from 2000-2008, raising annual per capita income to US$1 9 00. Strong growth is expected to continue. A key driver of growth is the energy sector, and in particular hydro-electricity, which brings in revenues and helps power a nascent industrial sector. Tourism is another major source of revenue for Bhutan. Bhutan is vulnerable to natural disasters. Located in the Himalayas, a region of powerful tectonic activity, Bhutan has suffered from earthquakes throughout its history, with a quake registering 6.3 on the Richter scale as recently as 2009. Glacial f loods have damaged development structures in the recent past. The availability of land and steady growth in the agricultural work force provide hope that basic nutrition and quality of life will continue to improve. Bhutan has also registered a steady rise in permanent crops suggesting that with support and training the country can increase its own food security. Bhutan became a member of FAO in 1981, and an FAO Representative Office was opened in the capital, Thimphu, in April 1985. However, FA O had been providing development assistance to Bhutan since 1972. FAO support to the country grew and expanded with the establishment of the country office. FAO’s support to Bhutan has focused mainly on two areas – sustainable forest management and food security, including food quality and safety. Increased food production was supported by projects that built the capacities of Bhutanese officials and farmers, and encouraged the rational use of fertilizers and chemical pesticides. Operational and management plans, information generation, and forest classifications were developed for the forestry sector. Today FAO is assisting Bhutan through 21 projects. Bhutan also benefits from FAO regional and global programmes, including the Special Programme for Food Security (SPFS) and the Regional Programme for Food Security (RPFS).

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