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Agriculture and the food value chain 2005–2015










FAO. 2022. Agriculture and the food value chain 2005–2015. FAOSTAT Analytical Brief Series No 51. Rome.


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    Estimating the food value chain decomposition by industries and primary factors 2024
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    This statistics working paper presents an estimation methodology for decomposing food expenditure across the industries and the primary factors of the food value chain (FVC). The approach outlined is based on the Global Food Dollar methodology developed by the Economic Research Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA-ERS) and Cornell University. FAO has enriched the analytical scope of the methodology by adding the industry and primary factors decomposition. Country coverage has also been increased by adapting the methodology to different data types and sources.
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    A quantitative analysis of trends in agricultural and food global value chains (GVCs)
    Background paper for The State of Agricultural Commodity Markets (SOCO) 2020
    2020
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    Over the last decade, increasing international fragmentation of production has affected both trade and production: these activities have become increasingly organized around what is commonly referred to as global value chains (GVCs). Increased fragmentation has brought with it challenges of tracing and measuring international divisions of labor, value-added, and so forth. In fact, conventional measures of trade only measure the gross value of exchanges between partners. They are not able to reveal how foreign producers, upstream in the value chain, are connected to final consumers at the end of the value chain. The aim of this paper is to use a globally consistent set of country-level data on GVC participation positioning in the agri-food sectors to distill global and regional trends in GVC participation between 1995-2015. It also focuses on five selected countries: Brazil, Germany, Ghana, Nepal, and Viet Nam - to illustrate how country-specific characteristics affect GVC participation trends as well as identify major differences across countries. This is the first time such a detailed trend analysis has been carried out for the agricultural and food sectors, with near-universal regional coverage, and covering two decades. The authors suggest that the inter-temporal and cross-country trends identified in this paper can contribute to derive insights into development pathways for low-and middle-income countries, as well as identify how key characteristics of countries will affect the way it uses international trade to boost domestic agricultural productivity growth.
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    Revenue distribution through the seafood value chain 2006
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    This Circular defines the value chain as the range of services required to bring a product from conception to the final consumer. For seafood products this includes capture (or culture), processing, distribution and marketing. A theoretical basis of value chain analysis, as the value added at each step of the chain, is explained and a methodology developed. The application is demonstrated in four cases studies of different fisheries, two in developing countries and two in developed. Tw o different types of product are covered: white fish fillets (cod from Iceland and Nile perch from the United Republic of Tanzania) and small pelagic fish (herring from Denmark and anchovy from Morocco). Despite the difficulties of obtaining data, the case studies demonstrate some common trends between the two sets of products. However, in the case of white fish fillets the retail sector absorbs 61 percent of the value chain in the United Republic of Tanzania but only 37 percent in Ice land: that is more value accrues to the producers in Iceland. For small pelagics the retail sector for Danish herring adds 38 percent of the value while for Moroccan anchovy the figure is 75 percent. It is acknowledged that these four case studies, based on imperfect data, are only a starting point and that more value chain analysis should be undertaken to confirm and expand these results. Researchers in developing countries are encouraged to apply the methodology developed here to t heir fisheries in order to generate a larger body of information.

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