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International Symposium on Sustainable Animal Production and Health

Current status and way forward, Vienna, Austria, 28 June to 2 July 2021









Viljoen, G., Garcia Podesta, M. & Boettcher, P. (eds). 2023. International Symposium on Sustainable Animal Production and Health – Current status and way forward. Vienna, Austria, 28 June to 2 July 2021. Rome, FAO.



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    FAO/IAEA International Symposium on Applications of Gene-based Technologies for Improving Animal Production and Health in Developing Countries 2004
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    The symposium was held from 6 to 10 October 2003 in Vienna. One hundred and thirty scientists and decision-makers from 60 Member States participated in the Symposium. A total of 44 oral and 33 poster presentations were made. The programme consisted of opening addresses, an opening session to set the scene and four scientific sessions covering, respectively, animal breeding and genetics; animal health; animal nutrition; and environmental, ethical, safety and regulatory aspects of gene-based techn ologies. There were also three panel discussions. In the opening address session, three distinguished speakers (Werner Burkart, DDG and Head of the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, IAEA; Samuel Jutzi, Director, Animal Production and Health Division, FAO; and James Dargie, Director, FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Applications in Food and Agriculture) presented their views. Mr Burkart stressed the importance of the close relationship between FAO and IAEA for enabling the exploitation and deployment of nuclear technologies in food and agriculture. Mr Jutzi stressed the challenges and opportunities faced by animal agriculture globally, and emphasized the importance and nature of specific and general development policy measures for enhancing the impact of gene-based technologies in animal agriculture in developing countries. Mr Dargie emphasized the need for training, technical support and capacity building in developing countries for enabling the application of gene-based tec hnologies in key areas of the livestock sector.
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    Animal Production and Health Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division 2016
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    The Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture (NAFA) was established in 1964 as part of an agreement between FAO and IAEA to promote food and agriculture through nuclear technological means. This included atomic (stable isotopes), nuclear (radioactive tracers) and nuclear related and nuclear derived technologies. The Animal Production and Health Section (APH), one of the five sections of NAFA, has celebrated a historic 50 years in 2014. Since its inception in 1964, t he APH has conducted numerous activities and has had a long series of technical successes. Two of the best known achievements were the Section’s development and establishment of the radioimmunoassay platform that measures progesterone to monitor reproductive performance and improve fertility of livestock, and the Section’s unique contributions towards the eradication of rinderpest through the development and distribution of validated and standardized ELISA kits, and the provision of training, an d a laboratory quality assurance programme to IAEA and FAO Member States.
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    Nuclear applications in animal production and health 2016
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    The Joint Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)/International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture assists member countries, through the use of nuclear and nuclear-related technologies, to improve livestock productivity through the efficient use of locally available or alternative feed resources, the optimal utilization of livestock reproduction and breeding practices, and the development and transfer of technologies for detec tion of transboundary animal and zoonotic diseases, including those that pose a potential bio-threat.

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