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The Livestock Sector in the World Development Report 2008: Re-assessing the Policy Priorities

Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative: A Living from Livestock









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    Project
    Supporting Investments in Low Carbon and Resilient Livestock Development in Africa - GCP/GLO/362/WBK 2023
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    By 2050, the world’s population is projected to reach 9.8 billion, representing an increase of nearly one-third more than today’s population. Over half of this projected population growth is expected to take place in Africa, particularly in sub-Saharan countries. Much of the world’s additional food demand will originate in these areas, with demand for animal source foods driven by growing urban populations with increasing incomes. Livestock help to combat hunger and malnourishment in areas where higher infant mortality correlates with greater protein and critical micro-nutrient deficiencies. At the same time, livestock are both a driver of, and vulnerable to, climate change. The contribution of the region to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is relatively limited; however, in many sub-Saharan countries, livestock is among the sectors with most GHG emissions. Sub-Saharan Africa is also one of the regions where livestock production is most vulnerable to climate change. Climate-smart agriculture (CSA) is an approach to managing landscapes, agroprocessing and food supply chains that enables the food system to meet both the climate challenge and deliver climate solutions. Large-scale World Bank (WB) investments targeted at the livestock sector provide an opportunity to make transformative changes for climate-smart and sustainable livestock development. The aim of the project was thus to provide technical assistance, training and tools to World Bank project teams to enable them to enhance and assess the contribution of selected country operations to the three climate-smart livestock (CSL) ‘pillars’: productivity, climate change adaptation and climate change mitigation.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Guidelines resistance management and integrated parasite control in ruminants 2004
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    Population growth, rapidly increasing urbanization and growth in income in developing countries are creating a tremendous increase in the demand for food of animal origin. This livestock revolution is demand-driven, illustrated by the fact that meat consumption in developing countries grew approximately three times more than it did in the developed world during the period from the early 1970s to the mid 1990s. During the same period the production of animal food products also grew most dramatically in the countries with the increased demand. In fact the meat production in developing countries, with the exception of sub-Saharan Africa, grew at more than five times the rate in the developed countries. The projections of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) using IMPACT (International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Consumption) are that the consumption of meat and milk in developing countries will grow by about 3 percent per year between now (2003) and 2020 (Delgado et al., 1999). It is likely that this will improve the livelihood of small and medium scale market oriented farmers but only if an enabling environment is created including access to credit, development of infrastructure and animal production and health services. Farmers need access to information regarding disease control and livestock management supporting their ability to decide where to invest their resources to increase production and productivity.
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    Document
    Pro-Poor Livestock Sector Development in Latin America: A Policy Overview
    Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative: A Living from Livestock
    2007
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    Since smallholders make up the large majority of the rural poor in Latin America, productivity gains and increased returns to their assets could contribute to widespread poverty alleviation. One such opportunity may be offered through diversification into high-value agricultural products, such as fruits, vegetables, meat or dairy products. This paper presents a case for investing public resources to support smallholder diversification and specialisation into high-value livestock products, review s the current livestock policy framework in the region and proposes a number of institutional changes aimed at tapping into increasing the contribution of livestock sector development to socially desirable outcomes.

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