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Countries in the Commonwealth of Independent States: Agricultural policy issues in the context of the World Trade Organization








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Review of Agricultural Trade Policies in Post-Soviet Countries, 2016-2017
    Review of Agricultural Trade Policies in Post-Soviet Countries, 2016-2017
    2018
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    This document presents an English summary of the “Review of Agricultural Trade Policies in the post-Soviet countries 2016-2017” (FAO, 2018) available in Russian. The purpose of the publication is to provide an overview and analysis of the trends in agricultural trade and trade policies in the post-Soviet countries. The annual review serves to enhance transparency in agricultural trade policy measures, contributing to more stable and effective trade in the Europe and Central Asia region. This summary begins with an overview chapter presenting key developments in agricultural trade in twelve post-Soviet countries in 2016-2017, followed by regional strategies and programmes for agricultural export development, and includes short country chapters on Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, the Republic of Moldova, the Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan.
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    Plenary Meeting of the Eurasian Soil Partnership, Report. Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, 29 February - 2 March 2016 2016
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    The Eurasian region is located in Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus and includes Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan. The Eurasian region is diverse in terms of its climatic conditions, soils, flora, fauna, land use and human activities. Soil degradation is driven by complex variables, including climatic factors, economic factors, institutional and national policies. Soil degr adation and problem soils are a serious process that is affecting the soils in the region through various processes, in particular: salinization, erosion, soil organic matter, nutrient and biodiversity depletion, and soil compaction. The Eurasian Soil Partnership focal points and representatives of 13 countries from Eurasia (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Turkey, Ukraine and Uzbekistan), as well as rep resentatives of ICARDA, ICBA, CIMMYT, GIZ and the Kyrgyz Soil Science Community participated in the Eurasian Soil Partnership workshop, held in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic from 29 February till 2 March 2016. The workshop was convened under the International Forum on Eurasian Food Security and Nutrition Network and Eurasian Soil Partnership jointly organized by ECFS, FAO, the World Bank and GFAR. The workshop was organized around plenary presentations (in particular on Major Activities of ECFS an d its international partners on food security and sustainable soil management (2013-2015)) and plenary discussions for ECFS collaborative research and educational programs, network activities and future directions. Further discussions held on parallel sessions for Barriers preventing Sustainable Soil Management (SSM) application and recommended SSM practices, Identification of appropriate sustainable soil management practices and systems at regional and national levels and Adoption of Final Docu ments. Under the moderation of Chair of Dr. Hukmatullo Ahmadov, the Challenges of GSP, the outcomes of the EASP activities in 2014-2015, the Introduction to the Implementation Plan for EASP and Assessments of the barriers and shortcomings preventing the adoption of SSM practices at the national level by Eurasian region countries was discussed and was adopted to be included in Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ as the Summary of barriers to sustainable soil management in Eurasia and possible ways of overcomin g them. Under the moderation of Vice-Chair Dr Gulchekhra Khasankhanova, the working plan 2016-2017 was discussed at an open discussion and was adopted to be included in Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ as the Workplan 2016-2017. Finally, under the moderation of GSP Executive Secretary Ronald Vargas, the work of the Eurasian Soil Partnership focal points and representatives of 13 countries from Eurasia was summarized via the Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ (please see Annex 1) which was accompanied with a “Workplan 2016- 2017” (please see Annex 2) and “Summary of barriers to sustainable soil management in Eurasia and possible ways of overcoming 5 them” (please see Annex 3). The text of the Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ adopted and signed by all Focal Points was presented on the Concluding Panel Discussion of International Forum on Eurasian Food Security and Nutrition Network and Eurasian Soil Partnership.
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    The Diversity of Agriculture in Former Soviet and Western Balkan Countries
    Policy Studies on Rural Transition No. 2010-2
    2010
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    The aim of this report is to give a comprehensive picture of the effects of transition on agriculture in the 12 selected countries. The countries are (in alphabetic order): Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), Croatia, Georgia, Moldova, Montenegro, Serbia, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) and Ukraine. The collapse of the Soviet regime caused dramatic changes in Eastern Bloc countries. This is especially true in the agricultural sector. F or example, CIS countries have been faced with a 50% plus decline in agricultural output, which has resulted in a growing agricultural trade deficit. The basic ideas that underpin the future plans of these countries vary greatly. In the Western Balkans the key issue is undoubtedly accession to the EU as early as possible, although this seems like a long process for most of them. In the former Soviet countries in Europe (Western CIS) the transition process has not yet been fully finishe d, so they seem to be concentrating on modernisation. In the Caucasian countries resource management could be the most important area of further development. Although accession to the EU cannot be envisaged in the near future for the selected CIS countries, it is important to mention that the European Union initiated cooperation with them in 2009 with a programme entitled ‘Eastern Partnership’. The twentieth anniversary of the beginning of the collapse is a good opportunity to assess developments in agriculture in these countries, and to evaluate the status of the sector in the light of initial expectations. What are these countries’ main objectives in the field of agriculture? Has agricultural productivity and competitiveness improved? Is it possible for these countries to reach an acceptable trade balance? Are agricultural producers better off? What policy lessons have been learned? What is behind the diversity of individual country performances? performances?

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