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HPAI in Europe 2007: Concurrent Outbreaks in Poultry and Wild Birds









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    Wildlife and H5N1 HPAI - Current Knowledge (July 2010)
    FAO EMPRES Wildlife Unit Fact Sheet
    2010
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    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus that originated from domestic geese in 1996 in Guangdong Province in southern China (Xu, Subbarao, Cox et al. 1999) was first detected in humans and domestic chickens in Hong Kong in 1997 (Alexander 2007). Since 2003, H5N1 HPAI virus clade 2.2 has spread across Asia, Europe and Africa resulting in the loss of over 250 million domestic poultry including chickens, ducks, turkeys, quail and ostrich causing huge negative socioeconomic and liveliho od impacts, as well as affecting food and protein resources, wildlife populations and public health (Alexander 2007). In 2005, the first large scale mortality in wild birds occurred in China and since then there has been increased interest and concern over the role of wild birds in the spread and maintenance of this virus. This Fact Sheet provides up to date information on aspects of the H5N1 virus in relation to wildlife, particularly wild birds. More information is also available on the Sci entific Task Force on Avian Influenza and Wild Birds, jointly coordinated by the Convention on Migratory Species and FAO, www.aiweb.info.
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    H5N8 Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) of Clade 2.3.4.4 detected through surveillance of wild migratory birds in Tyva Republic, Russian Federation – potential for international spread 2016
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    H5N8 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus of Clade 2.3.4.4 has been detected in migratory birds at Lake Ubsu-Nur in Tyva Republic of the Russian Federation, located on the Central Asian Flyway. Detection of HPAI virus in this location in the past has repeatedly been followed several months later by detection of similar virus in other locations especially to the West and South of Tyva Republic. All countries along this flyway and those to the West in the former Soviet Republics, The Mid dle East, Eastern Europe and even Africa (especially West Africa) should be on the alert for incursions of this virus.
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    Potential risk of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) spreading through wild water bird migration
    Updated version
    2005
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    There is a potential that Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) subtype H5N1 might be carried along migration routes of wild water birds to densely populated areas in the south Asian subcontinent and along migratory flyways to Europe. Recent outbreaks of HPAI in Russia and Kazakhstan (August, 2005) attest to this fact. Looking at the major bird migration routes (Fig. 1), the HPAI H5N1 virus could possibly spread from Siberia to the Caspian and Black Sea areas in the foreseeable future. Some w ild water birds are nesting in the newly AI affected areas in Novosibirsk and Altai in Russia and will migrate to the above-mentioned areas for winter or stop-over on their way to Africa and Europe. Bird migration routes run across Azerbaijan, Iran, Iraq, Georgia, Ukraine and some Mediterranean countries, where bird flu outbreaks are a possibility. Also India and Bangladesh, which currently seem to be uninfected, are at risk because both areas harbour large numbers of domestic duck and the count ries are situated along one of the major migratory routes. They have the potential to become new large endemic foci of HPAI infection. Additionally, spring migration of 2006 may result in the spread of HPAI H5N1 virus across European Russia, because birds migrating from Europe and European Russia and Siberia have common wintering areas in Southwest Asia.

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