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The food security through commercialization of agriculture programme in the Caribbean region

Best practices and lessons learnt from the development of value chains








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    Sub-Regional Workshop on Artisanal Safety at Sea, Banjul, The Gambia, 26-28 September 1994 (Report and case studies) 1994
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    A sub-regional workshop on safety at sea was held in Banjul, The Gambia from 26 to 28 September 1994. Organised by the IDAF Programme, this workshop brought together 22 participants from Mauritania, Senegal, Cape Verde, The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea and Sierra Leone. A representative of the Canadian Centre of Studies and International Cooperation (CECI) and FAO staff participated as well in the workshop. The objectives of this workshop were: to review the results of the national acciden ts survey; to identify the fundamental problems and examine information on the status of safety at sea activities in the different countries and to prepare a draft proposal for a sub-regional project on safety at sea. The participants reviewed the status of safety at sea in the seven countries which represent the north side of IDAF intervention area. Great changes have occurred in the artisanal fishing fleets of the sub-region over the past 15 years. The changes have come about mainly becau se of the development of new fisheries, the introduction of new fishing techniques and the higher level of the motorization. These innovations have enabled fishermen to make greater catches. Unfortunately, this development has quite often been accompanied with some unpleasant and connected effects at various levels. One of the direct consequences of these side effects is that in countries with historical seafaring backgrounds there has been a gradual degradation of traditional navigational and seafaring skills over the years. The result is the high debt that the fishermen pay each year to the sea, as a result of repeated accidents and wreckages which range from a simple capsizing of boats with no serious consequences to a fatal collision between small and large boats.
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    A review of school feeding programmes in the Caribbean Community
    A driver for food and nutrition security
    2021
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    This review provides a snapshot of the state-of-art of School Feeding Programmes in 14 of the 15 CARICOM Member States. It provides an overview of the different models of school feeding programmes that currently exist in the Caribbean, challenges faced and recommendations for improvement. Among the aspects evaluated include: the governance structure, nutritional quality of meal served, linkages with small farmers for the procurement of products used in the meals, involvement of children in school gardens related activities, etc. The document includes a case study for each of the participating countries (namely Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago). For each of these countries, an Annual Net Benefit Analysis was conducted, using information collected in 2017. The aim is that the document can provide preliminary information and recommendations that can be relevant for governments, public organizations, donors, opinion leaders, private sectors, and others toward strengthening school feeding programmes in the Caribbean. It was developed with the support of the University of the West Indies and the Caribbean Agro-Economic Society under the leadership of Prof. Carlisle Pemberton and Dr. Hazel Paterson-Andrews.
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    Project
    Sub-Regional Capacity Building in Sustainable Food Systems & Value Chain Development - TCP/SLC/3703 2021
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    According to the Caribbean Community ( a revitalized agricultural sector could play a central role in promoting sustainable rural development and food security in the Caribbean, moving away from an export oriented approach to promote resilience and innovation in the region’s smallholder based agricultural systems In order to tap this potential, individual efforts by single value chain actors would fail to generate the impact required across the region A more holistic and collaborative and integrated approach would on the contrary promote long term sustainable impacts and lead to cost effective, healthy and safe products for all, ensuring the inclusion and integration of smallholder producers, vulnerable consumer groups and rural populations The active participation of the private sector, from farmers and small and medium sized enterprises to multinational food companies, would attract the investments needed to improve productivity, create employment opportunities, reduce food imports and drive industry transformation To achieve these goals, the Governments of Barbados, Belize and Jamaica are committed to developing the agricultural sector by strengthening the performance of agricultural value chains However, the initiatives adopted in this field have often relied on external expertise As a consequence, the three countries requested FAO’s support to improve their institutional capacity to promote inclusive food systems and value chain initiatives strengthen the capacity of ministerial staff to design, implement and evaluate value chain development ( methodologies, stimulate cross departmental collaboration, local ownership, learning, innovation, sustainability and a greater impact on agricultural development The proposed project was therefore aimed at strengthening existing institutional arrangements, the skills of senior management and human resources, collaboration with other departments and the private sector, the training of VCD teams in the skills and methodologies required, and gender empowerment.

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