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Community guidelines for accessing forestry voluntary carbon markets










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    Article
    A future for Ghana’s African Rosewood – Potential solutions to ensure the survival of a keystone species
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Protecting forests in order to reduce tropical deforestation is essential to combat climate change and preserve biodiversity. Worldwide, deforestation is the second largest anthropogenic source of carbon dioxide release into the atmosphere, after fossil fuel combustion sources. The paper highlights that Ghana is currently losing its primary forests at an unsustainable rate and risks losing the African rosewood species forever. Using the Kalakpa Resource Reserve as a case study, it explores the devastating impacts that illegal logging and the resulting degradation has on local communities and wildlife. The paper evaluates the concerning implications for the achievement of SDG 15: Life on Land and, upon examining the supply and demand factors fuelling the trade, explores the potential of frontier technologies, particularly tethered aerostats, and other innovative means to address the challenge across countries. Finally, the authors offer policy recommendations that could improve protective mechanisms. They suggest that government stewardship and local community engagement needs to be urgently strengthened in order to enhance Ghana’s potential to restore the African rosewood and halt the loss of its remaining forests. Keywords: Ghana, African rosewood, Kalakpa Resource Reserve, Conservation ID: 3622813
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    Integrated Crop Management Vol. 9 - 2010 - Challenges and opportunities for carbon sequestration in grassland systems
    A technical report on grassland management and climate change mitigation
    2010
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    Implementing grassland management practices that increase carbon uptake by increasing productivity or reducing carbon losses (e.g. through high rates of offtake) can lead to net accumulation of carbon in grassland soils – sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Globally, the potential to sequester carbon by improving grassland practices or rehabilitating degraded grasslands is substantial – of the same order as that of agricultural and forestry sequestration. Because practices that sequester carbon in grasslands often enhance productivity, policies designed to encourage carbon sequestering grassland management practices could lead to near-term dividends in greater forage production and enhanced producer income. Practices that sequester carbon in grasslands also tend to enhance resilience in the face of climate variability, and are thus likely to enhance longer-term adaptation to changing climates. Developing policies to encourage the adoption of pract ices that sequester carbon has several significant challenges, such as demonstrating additionality, addressing the potential for losses of sequestered carbon, and engaging smallholders and pastoralists with uncertain land tenure. In addition, the paucity of data in developing countries hampers the measurement, monitoring and verifying of carbon sequestration in response to those practices. This report reviews the current status of opportunities and challenges for grassland carbon s equestration. Based on these observations, the report then identifies components that could foster the inclusion of grasslands in a post-2012 climate agreement, and the development of policies to improve grassland management.
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    Document
    Carbon storage accounting in Brazilian harvested wood products
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Brazil is one of the world's leading manufacturers of forest products, and 94% of the raw material comes from cultivated forests, mainly of the Pinus and Eucalyptus genera. Harvested wood products (HWP) can be an important carbon pool, based on the estimated carbon stored in the products in use. Thus, as of 2006, the IPCC began to allow the inclusion of these estimates in national inventories of greenhouse gas emissions. However, Brazil only started to consider these removals and carbon emissions by HWP in the 2020 version of the inventory (base year 2016). The primary data of forest production used in this study were obtained from the database of FAO (FAOSTAT) and of IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics). Only products manufactured with raw material from planted forests were considered. The methodology for calculating the emission and removal of carbon dioxide followed the IPCC guidelines defined in 2006. Three groups of products were considered: sawnwood; wood-based panels; and paper and cardboard. Of the three approaches commonly used to estimate carbon absorption and emission, the most advantageous calculation was the atmospheric flow method, which is based on carbon fluxes rather than stock changes. This approach benefits major wood products exporting countries, such as Brazil. To calculate the estimates, production in the last year (2016) of 13.4 million m3 of sawnwood, 9.63 million m3 of wood panels and 10.3 million tons of paper and cardboard were considered. The estimates obtained indicate that, in 2016 (considering the period 1990-2016), the annual net contribution of forest products estimated by the atmospheric flow approach was the removal of - 50,772 Gg of CO2eq. This removal corresponds to about 3.5% of Brazil's total emissions and 12.8% of LULUCF (Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry) activities emissions. Keywords: Climate change, Monitoring and data collection ID: 3622194

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