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Report of the regional workshop of the Asia-Pacific Fishery Commission (APFIC) on mainstreaming fisheries co-management










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    Book (stand-alone)
    Mainstreaming fisheries co-management in the Asia-Pacific 2005
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    There is a long tradition of fisheries management in the Asia-Pacific region. Traditional (or customary) fishery management systems evolved over centuries in response to increasing population pressures and the need to resolve disputes over access and exploitation of fishery resources. The control of access to what were initially “common property” resources was originally the responsibility of local communities and customary fishery organizations, but these systems broke down owing to modernizati on and their management was transferred to government. Unfortunately, government-managed models of management have also proved to be largely unsuccessful in managing open access fishery resources. Over the last 20 years it has become increasingly apparent that management initiatives will not be effective if the resource users (communities and fishers) are not fully involved in the management process. Focus has therefore now shifted from scientific/economic management models to those of co-m anagement that involve both governments and communities/resource users in sharing decision-making and planning, to varying degrees. This report provides a concise summary of the “fishery co-management” concept. It builds on the vast experience already gained in fishery co-management in the Asia-Pacific region and argues that it is timely to move fishery management more into mainstream, government-supported management processes (i.e. mainstream fisheries management).
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Report of the seventieth session of the Executive Committee of the Asia-Pacific Fishery Commission (APFIC) 2005
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    This document presents the final report of the seventieth session of the Executive Committee of the Asia-Pacific Fishery Commission (APFIC) convened in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from 23 to 25 August 2005. The APFIC Executive Committee's main function is to direct the conduct of business and affairs of the Commission between its biennial sessions. Major topics discussed at the session were: progress reports on the intersessional activities of APFIC; regional response to the tsunami; regional fishery bodies in Asia and the Pacific; outcomes of the trash fish and co-management workshops; and preparations for the regional consultative forum meeting and the twenty-ninth session of APFIC. The Committee reiterated that the main focus of APFIC's activities during the next biennium would remain small-scale fisheries and rural aquaculture, which would be pursued through partnerships with competent regional organizations. It was also agreed that the emerging need for an additional focus on fisheries trade and food safety (for both aquaculture and capture fisheries) would be brought into an expanded portfolio of activities for APFIC. A summary of the main recommendations and decisions are included in the session report.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Building capacity for mainstreaming fisheries co-management in Indonesia. Course book
    FAO FishCode CTC Project
    2009
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    This course book was prepared in support of a training course on fisheries co-management in Indonesia. It introduces the principles and practice of fisheries co-management with the objective of improving knowledge and skills to successfully develop fisheries co-management institutions. The course book is composed of four main modules which specifically address the fundamentals of fisheries co-management, its theoretical structure and the process of starting, planning and implementi ng fisheries co-management, all with a focus in Indonesia. From the numerous examples provided in this book, it is obvious that fisheries co-management has the potential to contribute to almost every sphere of fisheries management in Indonesia. It has a potential to incorporate the ecosystem approach and has proved to be effective in promoting conservation activities, including the protection, mitigation and rehabilitation of natural resources. There is a discussion of the criteria which may be used to assess a fisheries co-management regime in their relation to the type of aquatic ecosystem, the exploited species, the existing socio-political and economic system, and the prevailing rules and regulations. Attention is given to how the decision-making process takes place and the roles and responsibilities of the main stakeholders in co-managing fisheries, namely the community users of fisheries resources and the government. The book pays particular attention to the theory and benefits of community organization as a basis for successfully implementing co-management on the ground. The process of organization involves education, empowerment, developing or revitalizing values and ethics systems, developing notions of independence and partnership, developing organizational and leadership skills, and assisting the community to take action. The participatory action research approach methodology applied to fisheries co-management is outlined. Co-management assessment through monitoring and evaluation procedures is described in detail. Finally, the main aspects of how to develop a fisheries management plan are elucidated using examples from rural areas in Indonesia where fisheries co-management has successfully been implemented.

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