Thumbnail Image

Video on how to defeat the mealy bug, Ghana








Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    A preliminary study on ecological features of two natural enemies against two vectors of pine wilt disease for mass rearing in Korea
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Two species of the genus Monochamus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), M. alternatus and M. saltuarius are well-known as vectors of the pine wilt disease and they causes economically damages in South Korea. Among various control methods to reduce the density of vectors, a method by biological control agents (natural enemies) is eco-friendly indispensable. Since 2017, we have carried out the studies on the parasitic natural enemies againt for the vector species and found two parasitoids, Spathius verustus Chao, 1977 (Braconidae) and Cyanopterus flavator (Fabricius, 1793) (Bracondiae), would be a useful agents for biological controls. For accumulation of biological data, we conducted a preliminary study on life span and parasitic rate of two parasitic wasps against for two vector species. As results, we found that S. verustus has the longest adult life span of 33.4±19.2 days (avg.) in M. alternatus (T=30°C, H=60%) and C. flavator has the longest adult life span of 25.1±10.6 days (avg.) in M. alternatus (T=25°C, H=60%). The average parasitic rate (62.5%) of S. verustus was highest in M. alternatus (T=30°C, H=60%). In addition, it is confirmed that the offsprings of S. verustus can be made by parthenogenetic reproducton. Keywords: Research ID: 3622037
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Smell the disease - Developing rapid, high-throughput and non-destructive screening methods for early detection of alien invasive forest pathogens and pests featuring next-generation technologies
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Global forests are increasingly threatened by alien invasive pathogens and pests. The magnitude of this threat is expected to further increase in the future, due to the warmer climate and more extensive global transports and trade of plants. Pests and pathogens are often introduced to new areas by trade with ornamental plants as intermediate hosts, and there is a great need to modernize the tools for detection of alien species in imported plants and in monitoring of those that are already established in our forests. To achieve this goal, research in forest pathology is focused on combining recent technological advances in robotics, next generation sequencing, and mass spectroscopic methods with knowledge about the specific metabolic responses in the pests and pathogens and the trees that they infest. Gas Chromatography (GC) Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) adsorbed on Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) fibers is one promising method with potential for high-throughput detection of larger plant shipments. By the establishment of a library of chemical fingerprints characterizing specific pests and pathogens, one could non-destructively scan a large number of plants in ports or nurseries to eliminate presence of disease. The species-specific combination of VOCs can be utilized to prevent introduction of harmful pests and pathogens to new markets. One pathogen considered as a quarantine species and a serious threat on-the-horizon for coniferous forests is Pine Pitch Canker (PPC), a fungal pathogen affecting a variety of pine species with devastating economical and biological consequences, especially if it were to be established in a country like Sweden where about 38% of the standing forest volume consist of pine. Pathogens like this one are already introduced in several European countries, and need to be monitored and identified early to prevent further forest damage – a challenge that Forest pathologists have accepted. Keywords: Climate change, Sustainable forest management, Research, Monitoring and data collection, Deforestation and forest degradation ID: 3499048
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Cypress Aphid Pest Control in Ethiopia 2011
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    In cooperation with the Government of Ethiopia, the Subregional Office of Eastern Africa (SFE) of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) introduced a parasitic wasp to control a fast-spreading aphid pest infestation threatening to destroy cypress tree plantations in parts of the Amhara and Tigray Regional States in the north of Ethiopia.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.