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International dialogues on forest landscape restoration and wood energy

Preliminary outcomes from multi-stakeholders consultations in sub-Saharan Africa










​Pirelli, T., Morese, M.M. and Miller, C. 2020. International dialogues on Forest Landscape Restoration and wood energy – Preliminary outcomes from multi-stakeholders consultations in sub-Saharan Africa. Rome, FAO




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    Project
    Capacity building on the Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) sustainability indicators for bioenergy in the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Countries
    A project funded by GIZ on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) of Germany Grant Agreement Number: 81227987 - Final Report
    2019
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    This report was developed in the framework of the project “Capacity Building on GBEP Sustainability Indicators for Bioenergy in the ECOWAS countries” (GCP/RAF/515/GER-GIZ), funded by GIZ on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) of Germany. The main aim of the project was to build or enhance existing capacities of local experts to understand, assess and implement the GBEP sustainability indicators for bioenergy in Togo and Ghana, and use them to inform bioenergy policy decision making. Activities were primarily based on the sharing of experience and lessons learnt from the full implementation of the GBEP sustainability indicators within the countries of other GBEP Partners, with a focus on wood energy. Furthermore, the project aimed to sensitize policy makers and relevant stakeholders in both of the ECOWAS target countries on the potential of bioenergy production and use to better contribute to GHG emission reductions by replacing fossil fuel and traditional biomass use, while harnessing socio-economic co-benefits. This report presents the main outcomes and lessons learned of the project in Togo and Ghana, where national workshops on bioenergy and trainings on the full implementation of the GBEP Sustainability Indicators for Bioenergy were organized, with a focus on the wood energy pathway both at household scale and at productive level.
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    Book (series)
    Renewable energy interventions in the wheat landscape in Uzbekistan 2023
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    Energy, climate change and agriculture are closely interlinked, and the introduction of renewable energy interventions in the agriculture sector can catalyse poverty reduction and climate change mitigation. The agricultural is an important sector of the economy for Uzbekistan as it employ over 26 percent of the total working population. Uzbekistan has universal access to energy in addition to significant fossil fuel resources, which are supported by a well-extended energy distribution network. However, the energy sector faces several challenges due to inefficient and outdated infrastructure, resulting in high losses as well as power outages, especially in rural areas. Access to stable energy is essential to rural farmers, especially for irrigation, as the impact of climate change is expected to intensify in the near future. This report is part of the technical analysis that informs the GEFs project preparation grant application (PPG) under the GEFs food system, land use and restoration (FOLUR) impact programme. The focus of the analysis is on three regions of Uzbekistan: the Republic of Karakalpakstan, Kashkadarya and Khorezm. Firstly, the report provides an overview of solar energy, wind energy and specific elements of bioenergy potential. Building on this, the report identifies specific renewable energy interventions that can enhance the agriculture production of wheat landscapes in the selected regions in Uzbekistan. In addition to the wheat value chain, the alfalfa, dairy and horticulture chains were identified as important chains for the country and the specific regions being considered. Furthermore, the assessment provides details on the specific types of renewable energy interventions that could be implemented for the specific value chains under evaluation, as well as the related costs and investment requirements. These interventions can help stabilize access to energy for farmers and overcome some of the current access shortages.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    The key role of forest and landscape restoration in climate action 2022
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    Forest and land degradation affects almost 2 billion hectares (ha) of land and threatens the livelihoods, well-being, food, water and energy security of nearly 3.2 billion people. Forest and landscape restoration (FLR) is a relatively recent response to address these impacts and aims to recover the ecological functionality and enhance human well-being in deforested and degraded landscapes. Forest and landscape restoration practices have also proven to have significant benefits for addressing the impacts of climate change. These include carbon sequestration and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, improving the resilience of landscapes and reducing disaster risks. Forest and landscape restoration is therefore one of the key solutions of the agriculture, forestry and other land-use (AFOLU) sector considered in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), confirmed in the Glasgow’s Declaration on Forest and Land during the twenty-sixth UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP26). This publication highlights the links between FLR and climate change mitigation and adaptation issues, and considers further opportunities to enable greater integration between the two agendas. Many large restoration initiatives have been launched in the last decade. More projects are under preparation through the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, including many projects of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). These projects, often funded under the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and other climate funds are emphasized in the report to illustrate the numerous climate benefits of FLR. As a relatively cost-effective approach to supporting carbon sequestration, conservation and sustainable forest use, FLR is playing an active role in enabling climate mitigation. Should the Bonn Challenge reach its goal to restore 350 million ha, it could sequester up to 1.7 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (Gt CO2) per year. Reduction of GHG emissions is also crucial, and the FLR approach provides a strong basis to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, especially through Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) activities. It can also support sustainable bioenergy, in particular the wood energy sector, a large contributor of GHGs. Forest and landscape restoration is also key for supporting the conservation of existing forests and landscapes to protect and enhance carbon already stored in ecosystems, such as those in peatlands. This publication describes the different tools that have been developed by FAO to better measure the quantities of carbon stored and other climate benefits achieved through FLR projects.

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