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Hunt responsibly to protect both wild and domestic pigs

African swine fever (ASF) communications toolkit






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    Article
    Protecting special wild tree species and traditional knowledge towards securing livelihoods of rural communities: A study on Kithul (Caryota urens) industry in Sri Lanka
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    People in tropical island countries have long-lasting connections with wild trees that help securing their livelihoods. Deforestation, extensive use of chemicals and unsustainable forest resource management have resulted in losing tree-based natural products and rural livelihoods based on such trees. As a tropical island country, Sri Lanka is a home for many different native palm tree species. When considering the economic value, Kithul (Caryota urens) has the highest potential and economic viability among the non-timber forest product categories in Sri Lanka (Senaratne et al, 2003). Rural communities use Kithul as a multiple-use tree with a considerable economic value through processing the Kithul sap into toddy, treacle and jaggery that have a high market demand locally and abroad (De Zoysa, 2017). However, it can be observed that the present consumerism and monocultural practices affect the traditional Kithul industry. The Kithul product supply is insufficient to accommodate the market demand and the products indicate a low quality. Hence, this research investigates the causes for the low quality of products and the discouragement of rural communities to involve in Kithul industry, and finds ways to secure rural economies and livelihoods based on such industry. Based on Sinharaja, Dediyagala and Peak Wilderness lowland rainforests, the primary data of this research were collected conducting semi-structured interviews with the villagers who involved in Kithul industry. The Kithul products were observed and tasted during field visits to collect additional information. The government introduced chemicals to increase Kithul sap harvests and the forest conservation laws prohibiting access to forests have resulted in declining Kithul industry. If the rural communities given limited access to forests and encouraged to grow Kithul trees in their home gardens they could practice their traditional knowledge related to Kithul industry to sustainably re-assure their livelihoods. Keywords: Kithul (Caryota urens) industry, traditional knowledge, rural communities, livelihoods, Sri Lanka ID: 3486467
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    Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) wild species are part of our culture and identity, but are threatened by unsustainable levels of hunting 2024
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    The SWM Programme team in Papua New Guinea has recently developed three posters to promote the production and use of sustainable and long-lasting Bilas. The posters are intended to be displayed in the villages where the programme is working.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Poster, banner
    Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) wild species are part of our culture and identity, but are threatened by unsustainable levels of hunting 2024
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The SWM Programme team in Papua New Guinea has recently developed three posters to promote the production and use of sustainable and long-lasting Bilas. The posters are intended to be displayed in the villages where the programme is working.

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