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Modelling the growing space of parkia biglobosa benth for agroforestry project

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022









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    Yield prediction model for falcata (paraserianthes falcataria (L.) Nielsen) in falcata-based agroforestry systems in Misamis Oriental, Philippines
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Sustainable adaption of Falcata-based agroforestry systems and improve tree component productivity in Misamis Oriental necessitates derivation of quantitative information on yield. The project was conducted to determine the yield of Falcata planted in agroforestry systems considering various stand characteristics, physiographic characteristics, cultural practice, and pest incidence. A total of 360 rectangular temporary sample plots (1000 m2 or 20 m x 50 m) across 3 cities and 15 municipalities were established. Diagnostic tests, correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis were used to develop the Falcata yield, prediction model. The result showed that the yield of Falcata under woodlot, boundary planting, alley cropping, multistorey, intercropping, and taungya agroforestry systems can be explained by age, merchantable height, site index, and spacing. The final yield model for Falcata is sqrtVolume (m3) = 0.1841444 - 10.42376*1/SI + 0.0029367*SP + 0.0842593*A + 0.0473169*MH. The newly developed model will serve as a guide in decision-making as to the right time to harvest, appropriate density, a suitable site for the establishment, and the right merchantable height for greater productivity. Keywords: Falcata, agroforestry, yield, volume, model ID: 3623089
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    Modelling pine and spruce wood mechanical properties in different initial stand density plantations in Lithuania
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Two main parameters of wood quality in constructions are wood modulus of elasticity (MOE) and bending strength (MOR). To understand what kind of quality wood we are growing in our forests and how environment and forest management could affect wood quality parameters, we need to model these parameters by stand, tree, and sample results. This would help to predict MOE and MOR for the future stands.
    To determine the influence of stand density and thinning intensity on wood mechanical and physical properties of Scots pine and Norway spruce, the data was obtained from experimental trials plots, which were established in 1990 by Institute of Forestry. The experimental object was divided to a smaller trial plots with different initial stand density: 2 plots with 3000-4400 trees per hectare, 2 plots with 2000-2400 trees per hectare, 2 plots with 1000-1200 trees per hectare. In these trial plots different thinning programs were used 3; 2; 1 time. From each trial plot 6 model trees were chosen (38 Spruce and 76 Pine trees).
    Models were created by SAS statistical package. General linear regression models were chosen to create 4 models for prediction of: dynamic modulus of elasticity for log (MOElog); dynamic modulus of elasticity for samples (MOEdyn); global static modulus of elasticity (MOE) and bending strength (MOR) All parameters for creating models were chosen as random effects. Stand parameter was stand density (SD). Tree parameters were diameter at breast high (DBH), competition index (CI), average ring width (RD), average ring density (RD) and log high (LH). Sample parameters were knot at fracture point (K) and sample wood density (WD).
    Best result for MOE models was in pine stand R2=0,82 spruce stand R2=0,85. R2=0,57 was in pine stand for MOR and R2=0,65 in spruce stand. Keywords: Sustainable forest management, Research ID: 3484790
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    Prioritization of indigenous fruit trees/shrubs for domestication in northern Guinea savanna, Taraba State, Nigeria
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Indigenous fruit trees/shrubs are essential biological resources in many agroecological systems globally, including Nigeria. They are essential for household nutrition, food security, poverty alleviation, and ecosystems sustenance. Despite their numerous potentials in rural households, food security, income, and ecological attributes, many remain in the wild state with little domestication efforts, limiting their economic potentials. The study was carried out to prioritized indigenous fruit trees/shrubs in the region. Semi-structured questionnaires and focus group discussions were used for the data collection on the existing trees/shrubs species, while prioritization was based on certain variables (farmers' preference and roles in economy). Findings indicated that 27 edible fruit-bearing species were identified, 67% were trees, and 33% were shrubs. The plant species belonged to 19 taxonomic families with Fabaceae being dominant. Individually, farmers' priority species based on food value, income potentials, medicinal values, and food security benefits were; Parkia biglobosa, Vitellaria paradoxa, Prosopis africana, Vitex doniana, and Adansonia digitata. The need to step up provenance evaluations and domestication efforts for future agroforestry and plantations establishment implied in the study. Keywords: Domestication, Cultivars, Germplasm, Prioritized, Savanna, Agroforestry ID: 3478035

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