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Strengthening the resilience of communities in Lakes State, South Sudan - GCP/SSD/002/SPA










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    Book (series)
    Resilience analysis of pastoral and agropastoral communities in South Sudan’s cross-border areas with Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda
    FAO resilience analysis report No. 17 - Analysing resilience for better targeting and action
    2019
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    The IGAD member states are situated in a region exposed to recurrent natural shocks, political instability and characterized by internal and cross-border population displacement. Conflict is the root cause of food insecurity in South Sudan where about 6 million people were estimated to be severely food insecure in September 2017. Internal and cross-border displacement prevents households from engaging in typical livelihood activities, inhibits economic growth and disrupts markets and trade routes. Consequently, income-earning opportunities are limited, and the Government’s earnings in United States dollars are very low, which has led to hyperinflation. The European Union funded “Strengthening the Livelihoods Resilience of Pastoral and Agropastoral Communities in South Sudan’s Cross-border Areas with Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda” project that aims to improve governance and conflict prevention to reduce forced displacement and irregular migration in the cross-border areas of South Sudan. In that respect, this baseline study was conducted to benchmark resilience and food security indicators in the intervention areas and to gain a better understanding of the drivers of instability and irregular migration, as well as of the determinants of food security and resilience. The results show that households engaged in crop production and sales and host communities have a higher resilience while the internally displaced person, refugees and households residing in counties characterized by conflict and dwindling economic opportunities are the most exposed to food insecurity. The best way to increase the resilience of all types of livelihoods is to augment the assets held by households while boosting their adaptive capacity, especially by promoting the diversification of income sources and improving education levels. These efforts should target the least resilient populations in the cross border areas.
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    Project
    Improving Food Security, Livelihoods and Income for Vulnerable Communities in South Sudan - GCP/SSD/006/SWI 2019
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    Although South Sudan is endowed with abundant natural resources, includingextensive agricultural land and reserves of oil, the country is disaster-proneand experiences protracted natural and man-made crises, which can manifestthemselves in the form of widespread and persistent violence, populationdisplacement and disruption of livelihoods. As the country faces a majorhumanitarian crisis, the number of people requiring aid has increased to nearlyhalf of the total population. This crisis put some parts of the country on the vergeof famine in 2017. This threat continues to linger, particularly in Northern Bahrel Ghazal and Warrap states, which suffer from a high prevalence of foodinsecurity and malnutrition. In response, the project put into practice a seriesof rehabilitation and development interventions aimed at supporting livelihooddevelopment for agropastoralists in both states.
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    Document
    South Sudan Situation Report – July 2017 2017
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    A concerted and massive humanitarian response is containing famine in Unity State, with the number of people in famine conditions in the county down from a projected 90 000 to 25 000. However, hunger continues to spread across the country with 6 million people now severely food insecure. Of these, 1.7 million people – increased from 1 million in February – are at risk of famine (IPC Phase 4). In addition, 20 000 people in Ayod County of Greater Jonglei, where food security is deteriorating rapid ly, are facing famine conditions. Armed conflict, a continued economic crisis and below-average 2016 harvests, which were exhausted well before the ongoing lean season, are the main drivers of the worsening food security. In Greater Equatoria, and particularly some of South Sudan’s most productive areas, fighting has severely disrupted agricultural activities and markets, forcing huge numbers of the population to flee to Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo and causing many to miss th e 2017 main planting season. Acute malnutrition remains a major emergency in many parts of the country, driven by conflict, displacement, poor access to services, disease outbreaks, extremely poor diet (quality and quantity) and low coverage of sanitation facilities.

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