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The Kyrgyz Republic

Opportunities and challenges to agricultural growth







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    Book (series)
    Capture fisheries and aquaculture in the Kyrgyz Republic: current status and planning. 2008
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    Annual fish production in the Kyrgyz Republic (or Kyrgyzstan) has fallen significantly since independence in 1991. In 1991, fish production (inland and aquaculture) was estimated at more than 1 361 tonnes. By 2006, it had decreased to 71 tonnes. In the same period, more than 90 percent of state fish farms were privatized as part of the economic changes that followed the breakup of the former Union of the Soviet Socialist Republics. In February 2007, the Government of Kyrgyzstan, throug h the Ministry of Agriculture, Water Resources and Processing Industry (MAWRPI), requested FAO to provide technical assistance for the sustainable development and management of the fishery sector in the country. FAO, through its European Community (EC)/FAO facility for consultancy services, approved Project GCP/GLO/162/EC – Kyrgyzstan – “Development of inland fisheries and aquaculture in the Kyrgyz Republic to reduce rural food insecurity”. This FAO Fisheries Circular has two main ai ms. First, it is intended to inform those interested in fisheries and aquaculture in Kyrgyzstan about the current situation with regard to fishery resources and their utilization in the country. Second, it attempts to provide an example of a consultative and participatory policy framework development process, which might be of use also for other countries in transition in the Central Asian region. The documents presented here are considered as final versions and cleared as such by the Department of Fisheries (DOF) of the MAWRPI. The documents are also available in Russian language from the DOF in Bishkek. The Review of capture Fisheries and aquaculture in the Kyrgyz Republic is presented in Part I of this Fisheries Circular. Part II contains the final version of the Strategy for fisheries and aquaculture sector development and management in the Kyrgyz Republic (2008–2012).
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    Meeting
    Plenary Meeting of the Eurasian Soil Partnership, Report. Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, 29 February - 2 March 2016 2016
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    The Eurasian region is located in Eastern Europe, Central Asia and Caucasus and includes Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan. The Eurasian region is diverse in terms of its climatic conditions, soils, flora, fauna, land use and human activities. Soil degradation is driven by complex variables, including climatic factors, economic factors, institutional and national policies. Soil degr adation and problem soils are a serious process that is affecting the soils in the region through various processes, in particular: salinization, erosion, soil organic matter, nutrient and biodiversity depletion, and soil compaction. The Eurasian Soil Partnership focal points and representatives of 13 countries from Eurasia (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Turkey, Ukraine and Uzbekistan), as well as rep resentatives of ICARDA, ICBA, CIMMYT, GIZ and the Kyrgyz Soil Science Community participated in the Eurasian Soil Partnership workshop, held in Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic from 29 February till 2 March 2016. The workshop was convened under the International Forum on Eurasian Food Security and Nutrition Network and Eurasian Soil Partnership jointly organized by ECFS, FAO, the World Bank and GFAR. The workshop was organized around plenary presentations (in particular on Major Activities of ECFS an d its international partners on food security and sustainable soil management (2013-2015)) and plenary discussions for ECFS collaborative research and educational programs, network activities and future directions. Further discussions held on parallel sessions for Barriers preventing Sustainable Soil Management (SSM) application and recommended SSM practices, Identification of appropriate sustainable soil management practices and systems at regional and national levels and Adoption of Final Docu ments. Under the moderation of Chair of Dr. Hukmatullo Ahmadov, the Challenges of GSP, the outcomes of the EASP activities in 2014-2015, the Introduction to the Implementation Plan for EASP and Assessments of the barriers and shortcomings preventing the adoption of SSM practices at the national level by Eurasian region countries was discussed and was adopted to be included in Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ as the Summary of barriers to sustainable soil management in Eurasia and possible ways of overcomin g them. Under the moderation of Vice-Chair Dr Gulchekhra Khasankhanova, the working plan 2016-2017 was discussed at an open discussion and was adopted to be included in Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ as the Workplan 2016-2017. Finally, under the moderation of GSP Executive Secretary Ronald Vargas, the work of the Eurasian Soil Partnership focal points and representatives of 13 countries from Eurasia was summarized via the Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ (please see Annex 1) which was accompanied with a “Workplan 2016- 2017” (please see Annex 2) and “Summary of barriers to sustainable soil management in Eurasia and possible ways of overcoming 5 them” (please see Annex 3). The text of the Bishkek COMMUNIQUÉ adopted and signed by all Focal Points was presented on the Concluding Panel Discussion of International Forum on Eurasian Food Security and Nutrition Network and Eurasian Soil Partnership.
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    Book (series)
    The Kyrgyz Republic: Farm mechanization and agricultural productivity
    FAO Investment Centre: Country highlights, Paper commissioned under the FAO/WB Cooperative Programme
    2009
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    This policy note reviewed the status of farm machinery in the Kyrgyz Republic. Agricultural productivity, particularly in terms of grain yields, is low because of underinvestment. This note finds that a significant deficit in agricultural machinery is hindering sector productivity. The Kyrgyz Republic has fewer tractors per hectare than any comparable country, with a deficit estimated at 40 percent. The deficit of combine harvesters, estimated at 45 percent, is even more critical. When the age of agricultural machinery is taken into account, the underinvestment becomes even more acute. The reduced domestic production of wheat exacerbates food security concerns.Inadequate access to credit and small farm size are the main factors that constrain farm mechanization. The policy note presents three sets of short- to medium-term policy options to: i) promote the demand for farm machinery, by developing credit lines for agricultural productive assets, leasing, facilit ating access to secondhand equipment, and testing/demonstrating the efficiency of farm machinery for small-scale farming; ii) increase the supply of farm machinery, by facilitating the development of mechanical services contracting and improving access to farm machinery import markets, including for second-hand equipment; and iii) remove obstacles to private investment, by avoiding distributions of farm machinery or inputs in-kind, the setting of production targets for specific cro ps, and ensuring that the private sector is free to fulfill its role.

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