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Globalization of Indian diets and the transformation of food supply systems








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Westernization of Asian diets and the transformation of food systems: Implications for research and policy 2004
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    Rapid economic and income growth, urbanization, and globalization are leading to a dramatic shift of Asian diets away from staples and increasingly towards livestock and dairy products, vegetables and fruit, and fats and oils. While the diversification of diets away from the traditional dominance of rice with rising incomes is expected and observed, current food consumption patterns are showing signs of convergence towards a Western diet. Globalization and the consequent global interconnectedne ss of the urban middle class, is the driving force behind the convergence of diets. The rapid spread of global supermarket chains and fast food restaurants are reinforcing the above trends. Asian agriculture is on an irreversible path leading away from its traditional pre-occupation with cereal crop production, especially rice, towards a production system that is becoming increasingly commercialized and diversified. This paper addresses the opportunities and constraints in the transformat ion process. It discusses the prospects for the small farmer to share in the benefits from greater market integration. Finally, the paper identifies an agenda for science, technology and policy that will allow for a smoother transition to the emerging production and food supply system.
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    Myanmar sows the seeds for more diverse diets 2020
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    This brochure tells the story of how Myanmar is moving away from laws that envision rice-centric land titling and cumbersome land use conversions from rice to other uses. Such laws did not enable farmers to fully engage in this diversification policy, and limits their access to affordable seasonal credit. To spark immediate changes, FIRST supported the Government in implementing a National Land Use Policy that applies free crop choice and gives farmers flexibility to convert and unconditionally title their lands for different uses, such as agroforestry, rice-fish systems and aquaculture. This policy process, which has become more inclusive, is paving the ground for more diverse and nutritious diets.
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    Project
    Mainstreaming Nutrition in National and Regional Trade Laws and Regulations of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and Promoting Local Food Value Chains for Intra-Sids Trade - TCP/RAF/3707 2021
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    SIDS suffer from the effects of climate change shocks. Cyclones, hurricanes and more erratic rainfall leading to drought, flooding, rising sea levels and eroding coastlines exacerbate already fragile natural environments, making it more difficult to produce sufficient food to meet their needs. Given their geographic and economic isolation, many SIDS rely heavily on remote markets for their food supplies, leading to undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies and obesity, the ‘triple burden’ of malnutrition. Diabetes and other non-communicable chronic diseases are at excessive levels in a growing number of SIDS, largely as a result of a diet of processed imported foods that are high in sugar, salt and fats, aggravated by unchecked trade liberalization policies. Although undernutrition has fallen over the past three decades, levels of stunting still exceed 20 percent in children in the poorest SIDS. At the same time, levels of obesity, particularly among women, have increased sharply in many SIDS, including those in Africa. Food imports are an increasingly important source of food availability in most SIDS, despite the poor nutritional quality of many imported foods. Foreign investment in domestic food processing sectors in some SIDS has also contributed to the increased availability, and lower prices, of highly processed foods. The result has been a shift away from traditional, domestic staples, such as fruit and vegetables, towards diets high in processed and animal source foods, sugar, fat and salt. This shift has been identified as a leading driver behind the sharp rise in obesity and micronutrient deficiency in SIDS.

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