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Food and nutrition security assessment in Sudan - Analysis of 2009 Sudan National Baseline Household Survey

Khartoum, Sudan, August 2010









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    Book (series)
    Resilience analysis of pastoral and agropastoral communities in South Sudan’s cross-border areas with Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda
    FAO resilience analysis report No. 17 - Analysing resilience for better targeting and action
    2019
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    The IGAD member states are situated in a region exposed to recurrent natural shocks, political instability and characterized by internal and cross-border population displacement. Conflict is the root cause of food insecurity in South Sudan where about 6 million people were estimated to be severely food insecure in September 2017. Internal and cross-border displacement prevents households from engaging in typical livelihood activities, inhibits economic growth and disrupts markets and trade routes. Consequently, income-earning opportunities are limited, and the Government’s earnings in United States dollars are very low, which has led to hyperinflation. The European Union funded “Strengthening the Livelihoods Resilience of Pastoral and Agropastoral Communities in South Sudan’s Cross-border Areas with Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda” project that aims to improve governance and conflict prevention to reduce forced displacement and irregular migration in the cross-border areas of South Sudan. In that respect, this baseline study was conducted to benchmark resilience and food security indicators in the intervention areas and to gain a better understanding of the drivers of instability and irregular migration, as well as of the determinants of food security and resilience. The results show that households engaged in crop production and sales and host communities have a higher resilience while the internally displaced person, refugees and households residing in counties characterized by conflict and dwindling economic opportunities are the most exposed to food insecurity. The best way to increase the resilience of all types of livelihoods is to augment the assets held by households while boosting their adaptive capacity, especially by promoting the diversification of income sources and improving education levels. These efforts should target the least resilient populations in the cross border areas.
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    Social protection coverage – Sudan case study 2020
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    This research report presents a case study of the application of the proposed methodology to Sudan using data captured by the 2014-2015 National Household Budget and Poverty Survey (NHBS). The application of the methodology proposed in the toolkit requires the identification of individuals’ characteristics to fit them into specific social groups, and the risks to which each of these categories is exposed. This survey enables the identification of different social groups according to the age, gender and place of residence of the respondents,
as well as six risks: a child being out of school, food insecurity, unemployment, insufficient earnings, crop failure and livestock issues, and natural disaster. In conclusion, this study indicates a significant social protection coverage gap in Sudan. Government social protection programmes reach less than 3 per cent of women and men in rural and urban areas. Also government provision of formal social protection makes the smallest contribution to mitigating risks (0.4 per cent) as compared to other sources of protection. In other words, the benefits currently provided by the government are insufficient to address the risks that affect the population throughout the life cycle, hampering people’s livelihoods and the country’s development.
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    Book (series)
    The Food and Nutrition Security Resilience Programme in South Sudan
    Baseline report
    2021
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    This report acts as a baseline for the Food and Nutrition Security Resilience Programme (FNS-REPRO) of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), a four-year programme of USD 28 million funded by the Government of the Netherlands. This programme contributes directly to the operationalization of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 2417 by addressing the “cause-effect” relationship between conflict and food insecurity in Somaliland, the Sudan (Darfur) and South Sudan. The programme, which became operational in October 2019, is designed to foster peace and food security at scale through a multi-year livelihood- and resilience-based approach. The FNS-REPRO component in South Sudan focuses on developing the seed sector value chain: first and foremost with the objective to close the cereal production gap, while eventually providing more diversified products for local, national and export markets. The purpose of the study is to collect baseline values for identified project indicators, which will be tracked over time and used to establish the impact of the project. In addition, it identifies and documents lessons learned that will facilitate the continuous realignment of the current project’s theory of change and assist in defining and designing similar future food security projects in South Sudan as well as in other parts of the world with similar contexts. The baseline study was structured around the project indicators that can be measured at household level as well as indicators that will be used to estimate household resilience capacity. Estimation of the household resilience capacity is done using the FAO RIMA-II tool. Overall, the study employed a panel design with both intervention and comparison households. The current baseline survey focused on Yambio and Torit counties, the first areas of the project roll-out. The data collection covered about 600 households from the two counties (407 treatment and 192 control) in October 2020.

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