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Improving governance for reducing deforestation and forest degradation

Collaboration between REDD+ and FLEGT initiatives










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    Article
    Community-based investment to address deforestation and forest degradation in West Kalimantan, Indonesia
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    West Kalimantan is the province with high forest cover but contributing high emission from high deforestation and forest degradation. FIP-1 project targets in reducing emission from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). Achievement on reducing emission will contribute the Indonesia’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC). The project has two themes, forest management intervention and community investment to increase their income. A log-frame and theory of change is applied to measure the impacts. Baseline data was setup through data collection and analysis. Stakeholder analysis was carried out to design institution arrangement and capacity building program. Economic benefit was measured at local community. Rate of deforestation and degradation was measured using a GIS tool. During the period of 2018-2020, total project investment is US $6.5 million. FIP-1 project has invested a total amount of USD 4.1 million for the livelihood improvement program, and USD 2.4 million for the sustainable forest management. Total emission reduction during the period of 2018-2020 is 1.02 TCO2-e. FMU (Forest Management Unit) is the important party in this achievement and community involvement is a key success in this investment. Community income has increased by 50% in June 2021 (compare to the baseline in 2016). A total 63% investment has been allocated for livelihood improvement program, while 36% of the investment was allocated for forest management intervention. From this investment, a total of 1.02 TCO2e of emission has been reduced. An effective REDD+ program will require involvement from FMU and community as active players. Keywords: Forest Investment Program, West Kalimantan, climate change, forestry ID: 3488259
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    Article
    Forest landscapes restoration measures as a cost effective solution for climate change mitigation and adaptation in India
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Global deforestation and forest degradation have led to massive loss of biodiversity. Hence, it is important not only to protect but also restore the forest ecosystems. Forest biodiversity protection, biomass production and climate change mitigation and adaptation are important key motivation for forest restoration. Tree-based landscape restoration is a widely accepted cost-effective measure to combat climate change. India’s commitment of Nationally Determined Contribution to the Paris Agreement is to sequester additional 2.5 to 3 billion tons CO2 equivalent by 2030 through increased forest and tree cover and this ties in with the Bonn Challenge commitment to restore 21 mha of deforested and degraded lands by 2030 (now increased to 26 mha during UNCCD COP 14 meeting held in Sept. 2019) as well as the SDGs. This commitment can only be met if existing forests are protected and improved and tree cover is extended by 25 to 30 mha. The main objectives of the Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR) in India is to reverse the process of degradation of forests & improve its productive potential, improve the regeneration of native flora & enrich the biodiversity, and enhance biomass production, carbon stocks & incomes of the rural households. For a successful FLR works in India, focus needs to be on proactive involvement of communities and local people, better coordination among the various government agencies and departments for effective implementation of project activities, robust Institutional mechanism, and continuous fund flow and support to sustain the activities and keep the restored areas intact. Here, we present how India can achieve the NDC and Bonn Challenge through forest landscape restoration. Potential to increase forest and tree cover and the carbon sequestration that can be achieved has been discussed. This will support planning for landscape restoration through the past and on-going initiatives which identifies different types of interventions implemented. Keywords: Deforestation and forest degradation; Climate change; Biodiversity conservation; Research; Landscape management ID: 3469382
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    Project
    Enabling Improved Forest Management and Reduced Deforestation and Degradation - GCP/GLO/537/NOR 2022
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    Deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries represent about 10 percent of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, and pose a serious threat to global biodiversity, the livelihoods of millions of people, and key ecosystem services, such as the provision of clean water, materials, and prevention of soil erosion. Efforts to reduce deforestation and forest degradation, encourage restoration, and mitigate the effects of climate change depend on accurate and precise estimates of land cover and land use changes. Countries have been tasked with creating national forest monitoring systems capable of producing reliable statistics on the status and trend of forest area to track progress against nationally determined carbon emissions targets. However, many countries lack such systems and the barriers to create them (such as cost, data, computing power, skill sets) are many. Against this background, the project aimed to assist 13 selected countries in gaining full access to necessary remote sensing data, and to provide the knowledge and tools to process this data in useful information for sustainable forest management and reporting, to enable improved forest management and reduced deforestation and degradation.

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