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Food Aid in Response to Acute Food Insecurity








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    Plan of action for Malawi 2012-2016 2012
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    The Republic of Malawi is among the poorest countries in the world. The country is frequently hit by disasters, with many people affected by shocks such as dry spells, flooding, crop and livestock diseases, high input prices, and unstable markets. These often result in the loss of lives, assets and support systems. According to the Malawi National Disaster Risk Management Policy document, the intensity and frequency of disasters has been increasing, in large part owing to climate change, population growth, urbanization and environmental degradation. The recurrence of rapid and slow-onset disasters in areas such as the Lower Shire makes recovery progressively more difficult for communities whose livelihoods are already weakened by poverty and other underlying socio-economic constraints. Although – for over five years – Malawi has been producing surplus staple food, some communities remain food and nutrition insecure owing to the impacts of various shocks. In addition, most smallholder farmers are yet to generate meaningful incomes from farming. This is in part due to the narrow range of enterprises they pursue, low productivity levels and poor market access. There is an urgent need to address vulnerability and disaster threats and impacts in Malawi, taking into account the underlying challenges faced by the affected and at-risk communities. A more coordinated and holistic approach is required to help them transition from emergency and relief assistanc e to longer-term development. The Government of Malawi, with support from development and other partners, is focusing on socio-economic development through strategies that include supporting the increased performance of the agriculture sector. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is a key partner in Malawi’s growth and development objectives. As part of its Strategic Framework 2010–2019, FAO aims to strengthen disaster preparedness and improve linkages and transitions between emergency, rehabilitation and development. FAO uses the Plan of Action (PoA) as a tool to promote more integrated planning and coordination, and to guide a smooth transition from relief to development in disaster-prone and -affected countries. The current document provides details of the proposed PoA for Malawi. It describes FAO’s strategy to “bridge” emergency interventions to more medium- and long-term national development priorities and programmes for the next five years (2012–2016) in support of the Government and in partnership with key stakeholders.
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    Social protection as a pathway to sustaining peace 2024
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    Global crises are becoming the new normal. From climate change to the contemporary food price crisis, vulnerable populations – and especially rural people – are facing increasingly difficult odds of flourishing. Such challenges are even more pronounced where there is conflict, whose multidimensional nature demands to direct more attention to its drivers and impacts. Over the past decades, social protection has contributed to development outcomes, such as those related to poverty reduction, food and nutrition security, and gender equality. Besides, social protection systems have proven to be effective also in addressing covariate shocks, as exemplified by the responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. There has instead been limited operational research regarding social protection’s contributions to peace. In order to start addressing this gap, this paper discusses how social protection can sustain peace efforts by understanding peace not as an outcome but, rather, as an ongoing process. The paper argues that the contributions that social protection can make to peace can be divided between two overlapping scenarios: “working in conflict” and “working on conflict”. While the former refers to efforts aimed at offsetting the impacts of conflict, the latter relates to interventions that intend to deliberately address its underlying drivers. The working paper also recognizes that social protection interventions in a conflict-affected context can potentially be harmful and fuel social tensions in the absence of adequate consideration of local power dynamics. It therefore calls for social protection strategies and programmes to be conflict-sensitive – beyond the “do no harm” – to make explicit contributions to peace.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Striking before disasters do – Promoting phased Anticipatory Action for slow-onset hazards
    Position paper
    2022
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    Hazards may occur suddenly (sudden-onset) or develop over time (slow-onset) and threaten people’s lives and livelihoods and all the pillars of sustainable development. Since 2016, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has supported extensive country-level work on Anticipatory Action for several slow-onset hazards such as drought, cold waves, pests and diseases, Rift Valley fever and the secondary consequences of COVID-19. This paper summarizes FAO's conceptual and programmatic approach for anticipating and mitigating the impact of slow-onset hazards on the most vulnerable people depending on agriculture for their livelihoods and food security. Drawing on FAO’s experiences in implementing Anticipatory Action and the technical expertise built over decades, it recommends a phased approach to Anticipatory Action for slow-onset hazards as it reduces uncertainties associated with early warning information, improves the targeting of Anticipatory Action interventions and helps adapt the selection of Anticipatory Action options to the evolving hazard context.

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