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Agriculture and Nutrition: a Common Future







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    Document
    Bangladesh: Bangladesh Country Programming Framework. CPF 2014- 2018. Towards Sustainable Agriculture and Improved Food Security & Nutrition 2014
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    The FAO Country Programming Framework (CPF) for Bangladesh is a strategic planning and management tool which provides FAO with a sound basis for developing its mid-term country programme, in line with the policies and development priorities of the Government. The specific objectives of the CPF are to identify country level priority areas of work, assistance needs and investment opportunities; to make FAO’s response at country level more effective; to help coordinate and contribute to multilatera l goals relating to sustainable agriculture, rural development, food security and nutrition. The identified focus areas must also reflect and be consistent with the mandate and expertise of FAO as a specialized technical agency of the UN (defined by its corporate FAO Strategic Framework and Regional Priorities), and be consistent with other internationally agreed development goals (such as the MDGs). The CPF represents a milestone in the decentralization of FAO, and lays the basis for a more int egrated and “bottom-up” approach to FAO Programming at country level. Being formulated in close collaboration with the government, the process by which the CPF was produced has established a formal dialogue, created ownership, and instilled a shared agenda for work over the next five years. In turn, this coherence-in defining investment and support needs-invites support from Development Partners. This document is a revised version of the first FAO CPF for Bangladesh which was formulated in 2010- 11. The document is structured as follows. Section I introduces, while Section II provides context and current situation related to agriculture and food security in Bangladesh. Section III explores FAO’s relative strengths in the country and relates these to the new FAO Strategic Framework and regional priorities. Section IV identifies the main development challenges and priorities that were articulated during the stakeholder consultations, followed by the outline of the new CPF Country Priority Areas. Finally, Section V describes how these priority areas are to be funded, implemented, monitored and evaluated.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Integrating the right to adequate food in national food and nutrition security policies and programmes: practical approaches to policy and programme analysis
    Right to food methodological toolbox. Book 6
    2014
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    This volume outlines a simple and practical way to analyse the design and implementation of food and nutrition security (FNS) policies and programmes from a right to food perspective. The right to food approach, as an instrument to help formulate FNS policies and programmes, is emphasized. The primary focus is on national overarching FNS policies. The question of how to assess sector policies that may have direct or indirect impacts on food security and nutrition security is also addressed. Good policies need an enabling implementation environment, which includes evidence-based decisions, adequate financial and human resources and sound governance. These aspects are addressed within the context of the formulation and implementation of FNS policies. Programmes are operational instruments designed to implement policies. FNS policies with strong right to food underpinnings should give rise to action plans and programmes that translate such underpinnings into practice. For this reason, FN S programmes are analysed from a right to food perspective to assess whether are developed and implemented with full respect for right to food principles. The analytical and methodological approaches outlined here can be applied at two different stages: (a) when an FNS policy or programme is being formulated for the first time, or (b) when an existing FNS policy or programme and its impacts and implementation process are being assessed. This reference guide complements existing relevant methodo logical reference guides, such as are found in the Right to Food Methodological Toolbox.
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    Book (series)
    2018 Asia and the Pacific Regional Overview of Food Security and Nutrition
    Accelerating progress towards the SDGs
    2018
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    During the last three years, progress at reducing undernourishment has slowed tremendously in Asia and the Pacific. After years of gains in combatting hunger, progress has stagnated in all parts of this vast region. Despite decades of economic growth, nearly half a billion people remain undernourished. Children, in particular, continue to face the burden of malnutrition – this region is home to more than half of the world’s malnourished children – with one child in every four below the age of five suffering from stunting. This is a colossal human loss, given the association between undernutrition and poor cognitive development, with severe lifelong consequences for these children. At the same time, and almost paradoxically, Asia and the Pacific has witnessed rapid growth in the number of overweight children and the serious consequences that entails for their future health and well-being. This double burden of malnutrition sees undernourished and overweight children living in the same communities and households and it can even occur within the same child. Efforts to fight hunger and malnutrition must go hand in hand with those to build and sustain peace and there is an urgent need to accelerate and scale up actions that strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity of people and their livelihoods to climate variability and extremes. As migration from rural to urban areas continues apace, particularly involving poorer families, urban malnutrition is another challenge facing many countries. In summary, what is becoming increasingly clear is that the world cannot meet the 2030 target of zero hunger if Asia and the Pacific – the world’s most populous region – is not leading the way. It is a hard reality but one that must be faced with a united determination to turn things around. For the first time, four UN agencies have come together to jointly assess the state of food security and nutrition in Asia and the Pacific. Together, we hope that the findings of this report will contribute to a more informed dialogue. Without doubt, all stakeholders must make much greater efforts to accelerate progress toward the goals of a healthy and hunger-free Asia and the Pacific. Action is needed now. The sense of urgency cannot be overstated.

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