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Adapting to high temperatures: evidence on the impacts of sustainable agricultural practices in Uganda












Ignaciuk, A., Maggio, G., Mastrorillo, M. & Sitko, N. 2021. Adapting to higher temperatures: evidence on the impacts of sustainable agricultural practices in Uganda. FAO Agricultural Development Economics Working Paper 21-02. Rome, FAO.




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    Adapting to rising temperatures: farm practices and policy options in Uganda
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    Climate change is leading to a rise in global temperatures, which poses a major threat to agriculture production, and to the welfare of smallholder farmers. Identifying sustainable farming practices to reduce the sensitivity of Ugandan agriculture to rising temperatures is critical for safeguarding the livelihoods of farmers. This brief provides evidence on the positive impacts of organic fertilizer application, coffee-banana intercropping and cereal-legume intercropping on crop production value under conditions of high temperatures, and considers policy options to support their sustained adoption in Uganda and elsewhere.
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    Food aid supports climate adaptive investments by farmers in sub-Saharan Africa
    FAO Agricultural Development Economics Policy Brief 27
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    This brief explores the evidence on the relationships between food aid transfers and investments in climate adaptive agriculture using data from Ethiopia, Malawi and United Republic of Tanzania. Four climate adaptive agricultural investments are considered, namely: adoption of cereal-legume intercropping, use of organic fertilizers such as manure and compost, construction of soil and water conservation structures in fields, and investments in livestock diversification. These practices differ in their levels of capital and labour intensity,and their appropriateness for farmers will vary depending on the context farmers operate in.
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    Climate-Smart Agriculture in Yobe state of Nigeria 2019
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    The climate smart agriculture (CSA) concept reflects an ambition to improve the integration of agriculture development and climate responsiveness. It aims to achieve food security and broader development goals under a changing climate and increasing food demand. CSA initiatives sustainably increase productivity, enhance resilience, and reduce/remove greenhouse gases (GHGs), and require planning to address trade-offs and synergies between three pillars: productivity, adaptation and mitigation. The priorities of different countries and stakeholders are reflected to achieve more efficient, effective, and equitable food systems that address challenges in environment, social, and economic dimensions across productive landscapes. The country profile provides a snapshot of a developing baseline created to initiate discussion, both within countries and globally, about entry points for investing in CSA at scale. Agriculture is the mainstay for Yobe state economy employing over 80% of the population. Agricultural practices in the state are mainly rain-fed with majority of the farmers engaged in small scale subsistence farming with millet, sorghum, beans and maize as major food crops and gum arabic, groundnut, sesame seed and cotton as cash crops. A significant proportion of the population are pastoralists rearing livestock such as cattle, sheep, goats, donkeys and horses at commercial level. The agricultural sector in the state is struggling to meet the increasing food demand for its growing population as it battles with low productivity arising limited investments, low farm input use, land tenure and climate variability. In addition, the problem of flash floods, high temperature and incidences of pests and diseases have also aggravated the irrigation and upland farmers’ losses which consequently increase the incidence of poverty and malnutrition in the state. CSA practices and technologies such as the use of micro dosing, improved seed varieties, intercropping, planting pits, integrated soil fertility management, fodder banks etc. are quite widespread and their proliferation has been facilitated by ease of adoption, and multiple benefits such as food, income diversification and improved resilience. Although there are a wide range of organizations conducting CSA-related work, most have focused largely on food security, environmental management and adaptation. There is the need to also integrate mitigation into the State’s climate-smart agriculture development efforts. In addition, off-farm services related to CSA need to be enhanced, including weather-smart and market-smart services. The Yobe state government places high priority on the development of the agricultural sector in the state. The state ministry of agriculture is saddled with the responsibility of implementing agricultural

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