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Aquaculture Environmental Impact Assessment









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    Book (series)
    Environmental management and environmental impact assessment in aquaculture: Training Workshop for aquaculture managers. Entebbe, Uganda
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    The overall objective of the SmartFish programme is to contribute to an increased level of social, economic and environmental development and deeper regional integration in the Eastern-Southern Africa and Indian Ocean Region (ESA-IO), through the sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources. The programme is funded by the European Union under the 10th European Development Fund and is implemented under the overall responsibility of the Indian Ocean Commission. Within the framework of SmartFish Result 5, Output 5M3.1, improved Environmental Management and Environmental Impact Assessment in Aquaculture (EIAA) was identified as a means by which sustainable benefits from aquaculture can be ensured. The regional training workshop was organized for SmartFish beneficiary countries with the objective of enabling them to improve country application and compliance of environmental impact assessment and environmental management of aquaculture, which would in turn help them foster sustainable de velopment. All SmartFish member countries participated in the organization of the workshop, from the assessment of training needs, to the design of the training programme, through to the training itself. Based on the findings from the initial needs assessment exercise, the workshop targeted national aquaculture managers. Findings from the needs assessment suggested focusing on improving practical knowledge and skills to address the following topics:  Aquaculture inputs and resources;  Aquacult ure outputs and impacts;  Why undertake environmental management;  Site selection and estimating capacity;  Modeling aquaculture impact;  Environmental regulations and their application;  EIAA components and process;  Environmental Management planning;  Environmental monitoring;  Strategic Environmental Assessment. The training sessions involved active discussions and practical exercises, which included field tours and case studies. In the case studies, participants evaluated pond and ca ge based aquaculture investments within the context of EIAA. They took into account the technical aspects, as well as the socio-economic and ecosystem requirements and impacts likely to arise from aquaculture. The evaluation of case studies followed steps based on recommended best practices from EIAA and Environmental Management Procedures (EMP). 5 The steps below show how participants undertook the review of their case studies:  Evaluation of the business plan;  EIAA screening process;  Ide ntification of main issues likely to arise, including identification of key stakeholders, stakeholder consultation exercises (done during field visit) and risk analysis of the main issues;  Identification of data requirements for analysis, evaluation and monitoring;  Identification of mitigation measures;  Presentation of findings that were outlined as EIAA and EMP to the departments of Environment and Aquaculture1 for final evaluation, approval and licensing. At the end of the workshop, part icipants expressed the value of working together with all relevant stakeholders. Aquaculture as an enterprise is cross-cutting and EIAA and EMPs cannot be implemented effectively by primary departments alone. Moreover, participants were able to identify the key issues in their respective countries, and the appropriate practical steps needed to be put in place, which would enable them to become more effective in EIAA considering both their national and local conditions. The following were identif ied by participants as being the gaps for which additional support would be required in order to improve levels of effective implementation of EIAA in the region:  Specialized training that targets managers (both in aquaculture and environmental institutions), practitioners and the general public, focusing on building skills and improving levels of public awareness.  Building the capacity of the various public institutions and the private sector, through building Public-Private-Partnerships, i n order to implement EIAA and better manage the general environmental issues of aquaculture. The following proposals were put forward: the development and production of user manuals for the different audiences; the provision of field and laboratory equipment; undertaking Strategic Environmental Assessments; setting up specialized EIAA units within departments; and, establishing effective functional linkages between key departments, notably the National Environmental Management Agencies and Fishe ries aquaculture institutions. Information management systems should also be looked at.  Development and/or improvement of general and specific national policies, regulations, strategies and guidelines, including their implementation.  Adoption of environmentally friendly systems and practices at all times.
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    Book (series)
    Regional Training Workshop on Improved Fish Smoking Using The Thyarore System. Tanzania
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2013
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    The Indian Ocean Commission through the SmartFish programme, in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), is implementing a regional fisheries strategy programme aimed at improving the sustainable regional supply of fish and fishery products. The programme has five different result areas, the fifth one being food security, which primarily focuses on the implementation of activities geared at reducing post-harvest fish losses that occur in small-scale f isheries. Regarding post-harvest fish loss reduction, the approach of SmartFish is to build on what has already been done in the region. More specifically, to build the capacity of various key institutions in the region in terms of a systematic application of fish loss assessment methodologies in small-scale fisheries as a precondition for rational intervention, and indeed to find practical ways to reduce such losses. In line with the above, the Fisheries Education and Training Agency (FETA), in collaboration with FAO-SmartFish, organized a regional training workshop on improved fish smoking using the Thyarore system, which was held in Mwanza, Tanzania, from 04 – 08 November 2013. Seventeen participants from Kenya, Burundi, Rwanda, United Republic of Tanzania, and Uganda took part in the training. Participants were Fisheries Officers from the respective countries. The competency-based training programme had two main learning outcomes: participants are able to design and construct a Thy arore system oven/kiln; participants are able to smoke fish using the Thyarore system. The training was conducted by experienced experts from FETA and Senegal who employed a variety of hands-on type training methods and practical sessions. The pre- and post-evaluation suggested that the teaching-learning process was appreciated. Likewise, the participants’ perception of the training was generally high and observations from the post training evaluation indicated that many are now planning to intr oduce FAO-Thyarore Technology systems in their respective countries.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Harmonized border fisheries inspectors guide for promotion of regional fish trade in Eastern-Southern Africa 2015
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    Fisheries are one of the most significant renewable resources that Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) and Indian Ocean (IO) countries have for food security, livelihoods and economic growth. Efforts however, need to be made to ensure that as the population in these countries grows, and demand for food and employment likewise grows, the benefits that fishery resources provide, are protected through sustainable management and value-addition. The IOC-led Program for the Implementation of a Regional Fisheries Strategy for the ESA-IO region (IRFS) [SMARTFISH] was launched in February 2011 with the aim of contributing to an increased level of social, economic and environmental development and regional integration in the region through the sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources. Underpinning the Program is the harmonization of the region’s strategies and the strengthening of regional integration especially in partnership with COMESA, EAC and IGAD. The ultimate beneficiaries are fisher men, coastal communities and wider populations in Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. In terms of trade, the traditional focus on large international trading blocks and fostering trade from Africa to these blocks, has meant less attention has been paid to developing regional trade, which is thought to have great potentia l and consequently is a key focus of the program. Some of the most pressing issues facing regional fisheries trade relate to trade barriers in both regional and domestic markets. Average import tariffs for example between countries in the region are generally much higher than in developed countries and are thought to have weakened intra-regional trade significantly. Non-tariff barriers include challenges with border controls and documentation requirements which reduce competitiveness through inc reased costs to exporters. This document is the products of a regional initiative involving fisheries experts from seven countries: DR Congo, Malawi, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Based on the core principles of food inspection as well as internationally recognized best practices for safe and wholesome food, the guide promotes the recommendations of the Codex Alimentarius Commission and the UN FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. It provides the necessary administrative and procedural guidelines for the preparation and execution of official controls by Border Fisheries Inspectors and we anticipate it will be an important resource for regional economic communities such as

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