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Success case replication. A manual for increasing farmer household income by mobilizing successful farmers and groups to train their peers









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    Bhutan and FAO: Achievements and Success Stories 2011
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    In recent years, Bhutan has made steady progress toward meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Poverty has been substantially reduced from 32 to 23 percent during a short span of four years (2004-2007). Life expectancy has steadily increased, from 47 years in 1985 to 66 years in 2005. Bhutan experienced a successful and smooth transition to democracy in 2008. Bhutan’s economy grew an average of 8.75 percent a year in real terms from 2000-2008, raising annual per capita income to US$1 9 00. Strong growth is expected to continue. A key driver of growth is the energy sector, and in particular hydro-electricity, which brings in revenues and helps power a nascent industrial sector. Tourism is another major source of revenue for Bhutan. Bhutan is vulnerable to natural disasters. Located in the Himalayas, a region of powerful tectonic activity, Bhutan has suffered from earthquakes throughout its history, with a quake registering 6.3 on the Richter scale as recently as 2009. Glacial f loods have damaged development structures in the recent past. The availability of land and steady growth in the agricultural work force provide hope that basic nutrition and quality of life will continue to improve. Bhutan has also registered a steady rise in permanent crops suggesting that with support and training the country can increase its own food security. Bhutan became a member of FAO in 1981, and an FAO Representative Office was opened in the capital, Thimphu, in April 1985. However, FA O had been providing development assistance to Bhutan since 1972. FAO support to the country grew and expanded with the establishment of the country office. FAO’s support to Bhutan has focused mainly on two areas – sustainable forest management and food security, including food quality and safety. Increased food production was supported by projects that built the capacities of Bhutanese officials and farmers, and encouraged the rational use of fertilizers and chemical pesticides. Operational and management plans, information generation, and forest classifications were developed for the forestry sector. Today FAO is assisting Bhutan through 21 projects. Bhutan also benefits from FAO regional and global programmes, including the Special Programme for Food Security (SPFS) and the Regional Programme for Food Security (RPFS).
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    Book (stand-alone)
    A handbook for training of disabled on rural enterprise development 2003
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    There are an estimated 400 million persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific. A vast majority of them live in rural areas and are small farmers dependent on the agricultural sector for livelihood security. This practical handbook identifies income-generating opportunities for setting up small-scale businesses so that they may become self-reliant while remaining in their community. It is based on an innovative entrepreneurship training programme developed by FAO, enabling small farmers wi th disabilities to overcome social, cultural and psychological hurdles to becoming successful, self-employed rural entrepreneurs. It uses a field-tested methodology for promotion of micro-enterprises by small farmers by mobilizing successful, local small farmers to become trainers of their peers. The handbook takes the user through all the steps to be considered when a disabled person decides to start a small enterprise, from the difficulties and advantages involved and training methodologies to preparation and setting up of the micro-enterprise.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Participatory Communication Strategy Design
    A Handbook
    2004
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    This Handbook on Participatory Communication Strategy Design (PCSD) has been prepared as a training and field guide for designing, implementing and managing communication for development strategies for field projects. The PCSD methodology is used to build on the results of the Participatory Rural Communication Appraisal (PRCA). It outlines ways of involving people in the decision-making processes for effective communication planning and action. The handbook focuses on the process of planning a communication strategy design in a participatory manner. It clearly explains the principles and processes of communication planning, message development, multimedia material production and the implementation of communication activities in the field. Although it does not dwell on the technical aspects of production, the handbook specifies the requirements for effective use of communication approaches, techniques, media, materials and methods among rural communities. It pres ents a step-by-step approach to strategy design. In this way the reader will be able to plan, implement, supervise and monitor the whole process. PCSD has been prepared primarily as training and reference material to be used during workshops for communication skills development, as well as a guide for participatory communication strategy design in the field. For those who have not been trained in PCSD, it is advisable to attend a training workshop in which the principles and proced ures of the activity can be learned and practised before application at the community level. The communication strategy design process described in the handbook has been tested in training workshops. It has also been applied with success to various development projects dealing with agriculture, health, education, income generation, gender, water and sanitation, animal husbandry and poverty alleviation.

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