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Zero deforestation initiatives and their impacts on commodity supply chains











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    Book (series)
    Zero-deforestation commitments: A new avenue towards enhanced forest governance?
    Forestry Working Paper 3
    2018
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    The zero-deforestation movement has gained considerable momentum as governments and companies enter into commitments to curb deforestation. The most innovative are multi-stakeholder initiatives, where governments and international organi- zations have joined with the private sector and civil society organizations in making commit- ments to reduce deforestation. These pledges have created opportunities for improved forest governance by envisaging the private sector at the centre of the movement. They have also encouraged a broader understanding of the drivers and and consequences of deforestation, and how these can be more realistically addressed.
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    Booklet
    Potential implications of corporate zero-net deforestation commitments for the forest industry 2017
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    This paper summarizes a review of corporate zero deforestation commitments by consumer goods companies, retailers and banks and their relevant corporate policies for sourcing, lending and other deal making. Risks and potential benefits to the forest industry from zero-deforestation commitments by its customers and financiers are analysed and some recommendations towards the forest-based industry are formulated.
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    Article
    “Fisherfolks eat from the sea, why should we not eat from the forest?”: farmer narratives of forest conversion in Ghana
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Beyond global efforts dedicated to halting deforestation, in recent times, governments and companies are also implementing several voluntary initiatives to end agro-commodities driven deforestation. These initiatives are built on the assumptions that tropical forest loss endangers biodiversity, climate stability and forest livelihoods. While many of the assumptions hold in many ways, discussions around them tend to be dominated by governments, companies, and international organisations, neglecting the voices of subsistence farmers and forest-fringe communities (FFCs). Given that subsistence farmers contribute to about 33% of global deforestation, and that the meanings these farmers assign to their landscapes can affect conversation program outcomes, understanding FFCs perspectives about deforestation might provide new insights for effective zero- deforestation policies. Drawing on Narrative Policy Analysis, this paper traces the narratives that FFCs use to justify encroaching into protected forests to cultivate cocoa and food crops in southwestern Ghana, where restrictive deforestation policies have failed persistently. The article shows that FFCs are aware of the narratives, e.g., biodiversity, climate action, forest regulators use to legitimise forest conservation. However, they believe that their food security and quest for survival outweigh these ‘western priorities’. Besides, “the forest is finished”. The incongruity between farmers’ needs and forest regulators’ expectations complicates forest conservation attempts. Drawing on the political ecology literature, the paper argues that forest policy in the region needs to prioritise job creation and food security to have a chance at success, especially since most farmers in the region are prepared to put their lives at stake, converting forests for their daily survival. Keywords: Deforestation and forest degradation, Agriculture, Governance, Social protection ID: 3485073

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