Thumbnail Image

2006年世界水产养殖状况










Chinese version of: FAO Fisheries Department. State of world aquaculture 2006. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper. No. 500. Rome, FAO. 2007. 134p.



Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    State of world aquaculture 2006 2006
    Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world. Increasing global population demand for aquatic food products and it is expected that lion’s share of this future demand will come from aquaculture. This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    حالة الاستزراع المائي في العالم 2006 2008
    Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world. Increasing global population demand for aquatic food products and it is expected that lion’s share of this future demand will come from aquaculture. This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Comparative assessment of the environmental costs of aquaculture and other food production sectors: methods for meaningful comparisons. FAO/WFT Expert Workshop. 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada.
    FAO/WFT Experts Workshop, 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada
    2007
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The global food production sector is growing and in many areas farming systems are intensifying. Although food production from all sectors has environmental impacts and environmental costs, public opinion and regulatory oversight amongst the sectors in this area is uneven. In order to understand better the place of aquaculture amidst the other food production sectors in regards to environmental costs, the first session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries’ Sub-Committee on Aquaculture recommended “undertaking comparative analyses on the environmental cost of aquatic food production in relation to other terrestrial food production sectorsâ€Â. Comparisons can be useful for addressing local development and zoning concerns, global issues of sustainability and trade and consumer preferences for inexpensive food produced in an environmentally sustainable manner. Methods to assess environmental costs should be scientifically based, comparable across different sectors, expandable to dif ferent scales, inclusive of externalities, practical to implement and easily understood by managers and policy-makers. These proceedings include review papers describing methods for such comparisons as well as the deliberations of their authors, a group of international experts on environmental economics, energy accounting, material and environmental flows analysis, aquaculture, agriculture and international development.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    State of world aquaculture 2006 2006
    Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world. Increasing global population demand for aquatic food products and it is expected that lion’s share of this future demand will come from aquaculture. This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    حالة الاستزراع المائي في العالم 2006 2008
    Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world. Increasing global population demand for aquatic food products and it is expected that lion’s share of this future demand will come from aquaculture. This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Comparative assessment of the environmental costs of aquaculture and other food production sectors: methods for meaningful comparisons. FAO/WFT Expert Workshop. 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada.
    FAO/WFT Experts Workshop, 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada
    2007
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The global food production sector is growing and in many areas farming systems are intensifying. Although food production from all sectors has environmental impacts and environmental costs, public opinion and regulatory oversight amongst the sectors in this area is uneven. In order to understand better the place of aquaculture amidst the other food production sectors in regards to environmental costs, the first session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries’ Sub-Committee on Aquaculture recommended “undertaking comparative analyses on the environmental cost of aquatic food production in relation to other terrestrial food production sectorsâ€Â. Comparisons can be useful for addressing local development and zoning concerns, global issues of sustainability and trade and consumer preferences for inexpensive food produced in an environmentally sustainable manner. Methods to assess environmental costs should be scientifically based, comparable across different sectors, expandable to dif ferent scales, inclusive of externalities, practical to implement and easily understood by managers and policy-makers. These proceedings include review papers describing methods for such comparisons as well as the deliberations of their authors, a group of international experts on environmental economics, energy accounting, material and environmental flows analysis, aquaculture, agriculture and international development.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    State of world aquaculture 2006 2006
    Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world. Increasing global population demand for aquatic food products and it is expected that lion’s share of this future demand will come from aquaculture. This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    حالة الاستزراع المائي في العالم 2006 2008
    Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world. Increasing global population demand for aquatic food products and it is expected that lion’s share of this future demand will come from aquaculture. This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Comparative assessment of the environmental costs of aquaculture and other food production sectors: methods for meaningful comparisons. FAO/WFT Expert Workshop. 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada.
    FAO/WFT Experts Workshop, 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada
    2007
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The global food production sector is growing and in many areas farming systems are intensifying. Although food production from all sectors has environmental impacts and environmental costs, public opinion and regulatory oversight amongst the sectors in this area is uneven. In order to understand better the place of aquaculture amidst the other food production sectors in regards to environmental costs, the first session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries’ Sub-Committee on Aquaculture recommended “undertaking comparative analyses on the environmental cost of aquatic food production in relation to other terrestrial food production sectorsâ€Â. Comparisons can be useful for addressing local development and zoning concerns, global issues of sustainability and trade and consumer preferences for inexpensive food produced in an environmentally sustainable manner. Methods to assess environmental costs should be scientifically based, comparable across different sectors, expandable to dif ferent scales, inclusive of externalities, practical to implement and easily understood by managers and policy-makers. These proceedings include review papers describing methods for such comparisons as well as the deliberations of their authors, a group of international experts on environmental economics, energy accounting, material and environmental flows analysis, aquaculture, agriculture and international development.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    State of world aquaculture 2006 2006
    Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world. Increasing global population demand for aquatic food products and it is expected that lion’s share of this future demand will come from aquaculture. This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    حالة الاستزراع المائي في العالم 2006 2008
    Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world. Increasing global population demand for aquatic food products and it is expected that lion’s share of this future demand will come from aquaculture. This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Comparative assessment of the environmental costs of aquaculture and other food production sectors: methods for meaningful comparisons. FAO/WFT Expert Workshop. 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada.
    FAO/WFT Experts Workshop, 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada
    2007
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The global food production sector is growing and in many areas farming systems are intensifying. Although food production from all sectors has environmental impacts and environmental costs, public opinion and regulatory oversight amongst the sectors in this area is uneven. In order to understand better the place of aquaculture amidst the other food production sectors in regards to environmental costs, the first session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries’ Sub-Committee on Aquaculture recommended “undertaking comparative analyses on the environmental cost of aquatic food production in relation to other terrestrial food production sectorsâ€Â. Comparisons can be useful for addressing local development and zoning concerns, global issues of sustainability and trade and consumer preferences for inexpensive food produced in an environmentally sustainable manner. Methods to assess environmental costs should be scientifically based, comparable across different sectors, expandable to dif ferent scales, inclusive of externalities, practical to implement and easily understood by managers and policy-makers. These proceedings include review papers describing methods for such comparisons as well as the deliberations of their authors, a group of international experts on environmental economics, energy accounting, material and environmental flows analysis, aquaculture, agriculture and international development.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    State of world aquaculture 2006 2006
    Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world. Increasing global population demand for aquatic food products and it is expected that lion’s share of this future demand will come from aquaculture. This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    حالة الاستزراع المائي في العالم 2006 2008
    Aquaculture is developing, expanding and intensifying in almost all regions of the world. Increasing global population demand for aquatic food products and it is expected that lion’s share of this future demand will come from aquaculture. This document analyses the past trends that have led the aquaculture sector to its current status and describes its current status globally.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Comparative assessment of the environmental costs of aquaculture and other food production sectors: methods for meaningful comparisons. FAO/WFT Expert Workshop. 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada.
    FAO/WFT Experts Workshop, 24-28 April 2006, Vancouver, Canada
    2007
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    The global food production sector is growing and in many areas farming systems are intensifying. Although food production from all sectors has environmental impacts and environmental costs, public opinion and regulatory oversight amongst the sectors in this area is uneven. In order to understand better the place of aquaculture amidst the other food production sectors in regards to environmental costs, the first session of the FAO Committee on Fisheries’ Sub-Committee on Aquaculture recommended “undertaking comparative analyses on the environmental cost of aquatic food production in relation to other terrestrial food production sectorsâ€Â. Comparisons can be useful for addressing local development and zoning concerns, global issues of sustainability and trade and consumer preferences for inexpensive food produced in an environmentally sustainable manner. Methods to assess environmental costs should be scientifically based, comparable across different sectors, expandable to dif ferent scales, inclusive of externalities, practical to implement and easily understood by managers and policy-makers. These proceedings include review papers describing methods for such comparisons as well as the deliberations of their authors, a group of international experts on environmental economics, energy accounting, material and environmental flows analysis, aquaculture, agriculture and international development.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.