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Mountain soils key for building resilience

IPROMO 2022 presentation







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    Article
    Biochar opportunities: Building soil resilience while reducing wildfire, insects and diseases
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    More than two-thirds of the worlds’ soils have been degraded through the loss of soil organic matter and risk losing productivity. When soil organic matter is low, ecosystems are at risk for drought stress, wildfire risk, or insect and disease infestations. Therefore, restoring soils by adding carbon- rich materials such as biochar can boost soil carbon and increase both soil and ecosystem health. increased soil stewardship can reduce carbon emissions by at least 5.5 gigatons of CO2 per year (15% of or current annual emissions) and healthy soils are able to hold more water and nutrients, reduce soil compaction, decrease invasive species, and promote microbial diversity. Biochar can benefit forest, range, mine, and agricultural soils and can be a carbon game-changer to mitigate climate change. Forest restoration activities that reduce standing tree volume through small diameter thinning operations produce large volumes of low (or no) value woody residues that can be converted to biochar on-site or at centralized processing facilities. In addition, higher value biochar could be transported to local farmers to build agricultural soil carbon for greater crop productivity and food security or used in livestock pens to reduce leaching and runoff while producing a high- value fertilizer. This paper will discuss forest managements’ role in reducing wildfire, insect, and disease risk and the contributions of biochar to soil health and resilience. Keywords: soil health, drought, climate change, microbial diversity ID: 3602348
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Mountain women of the world – Challenges, resilience and collective power 2022
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    Women play a key role in environmental protection and social and economic development in mountain areas. They are often the primary managers of mountain resources, guardians of biodiversity and keepers of traditional knowledge. Empowering rural women is crucial to eradicating hunger and poverty. Yet, due to discriminatory social norms, rural women still face more barriers than men in terms of access to strategic resources and the opportunity to raise their voices, which limits their potential as economic agents and resilience-builders. This publication highlights the stories and voices of mountain women, with a focus on rural areas and mountain tourism, and outlines a path forward to promote their empowerment and help them to realize their potential as agents of sustainable mountain development. It includes on-the-ground interviews with mountain women in eight countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Italy, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal and the United Republic of Tanzania) and the results of a global survey. This study is published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Mountain Partnership Secretariat, together with the Feminist Hiking Collective – a non-profit organization and transnational hub for feminist hikers, and a member of the Mountain Partnership. It marks the 2022 International Mountain Day theme, Women Move Mountains, and is also a contribution to the International Year of Sustainable Mountain Development 2022.
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    Project
    Building the Resilience of Vulnerable Communities in Cross-Border Areas of Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia - GCP/SFE/005/IGA 2022
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    The objective of this project was to build the resilience of vulnerable communities in five cross border areas in arid and semi arid lands (ASAL) of Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia by working towards the Priority Intervention Areas (PIAs) of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) Drought Disaster Resilience Sustainability Initiative (IDDRSI), which are: (1) Natural Resources and Environment Management; (2) Market Access, Trade and Financial Services; (3) Enhanced Production and Livelihood Diversification; (4) Disaster Risk Management; (5) Research, Knowledge Management and Technology Transfer; (6) Peace Building, Conflict Prevention and Resolution; (7) Institutional Strengthening, Coordination and Partnerships; and (8) Human Capital, Gender and Social Development. The interventions targeted pastoralist and agropastoralist communities and focused on strengthening capacities in drought prediction and monitoring, supporting the development of resilience related policies, and boosting investments in local communities.

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