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Decent rural employment







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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Promoting decent rural employment 2017
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    Promoting policies and investments that support the creation of decent employment opportunities in rural areas is crucial to generating livelihoods for the world’s poor. Rural people depend on agriculture and their own labour to earn a living; yet, rural employment opportunities are often scarce, informal, hazardous and poorly remunerated. To meet the Sustainable Development Goals and eradicate poverty and hunger by 2030, FAO works to build lasting policy changes that foster rural employment. B y supporting the development of strategies and programmes that create more and better jobs, FAO helps governments stimulate both the agricultural and the rural, non-farm economies. This includes promoting the application of international labour standards, particularly for eliminating child labour in agriculture, and partnering with national stakeholders to build human capital by improving access to vocational and entrepreneurial training and strengthening the capacity of rural organizations. FA O also helps countries address the root causes of distress migration by boosting decent employment opportunities in rural areas, while building resilience and risk management mechanisms to protect rural livelihoods.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Tanzania Mainland country profile: gender inequalities in rural employment in Tanzania Mainland, an overview 2014
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    This country profile, prepared by the Social Protection Division (ESP) of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), aims to contribute to a better understanding of the types and the degree of existing employment-related gender inequalities in rural settings of Tanzania Mainland and highlight key areas of attention for policy makers conducive to poverty reduction and food security. It constitutes an important added value to existing sources, most notably because it provid es rural-specific information and cross-examines different dimensions of inequality. The country profile assesses the nature and degree of existing gender disparities in employment and income in rural areas, linking them to factors such as education, age and wealth when possible. Tanzania Mainland remains a primarily rural country with an agriculture-based economy and significant rural-urban and regional socio-economic disparities. It is widely recognized that improving the performance of the ag riculture sector is critical for poverty reduction and food security. At the same time, a body of evidence has demonstrated that the underperformance of the agriculture sector is partially due to the existing gender inequalities in access, use and control of assets, resources, and services, including rural employment. Women, particularly in rural areas, are often disadvantaged in terms of decent work and income generating opportunities owing to limited access and control over resources, includin g education and training, land and decision-making powers. Rural women face greater difficulties in translating their labour into gainful and productive work that could ultimately lead to a reduction of poverty and enhancement of food security. Agriculture is the largest sector of employment in Tanzania Mainland, with the vast majority of rural women and men employed in agriculture, mostly as self-employed on their own farms. The present country profile identified persisting gender inequalities in Tanzania Mainland, particularly in terms of access to productive resources, income generating and employment opportunities, time-use patterns and educational possibilities.
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    Book (series)
    Strengthening decent rural employment opportunities for youth across different processes in the forest value chain in Uganda
    Practices and lessons
    2021
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    This report addresses the subject of decent rural employment for youth in the forestry sector. It is based on case studies carried out across different processes in the value chain within the sector in Uganda, ranging from seedbed development through to plantation management, saw logging and trading. Findings indicate that a considerable number of Uganda’s legal and policy frameworks emphasize the participation of youth in the labour market, especially given that young people constitute a large majority of the country’s population. However, only a few of these frameworks focus on decent work, whether for young people or the country’s workers more generally. The case studies revealed that efforts to provide decent employment were mixed. Larger and more formally oriented forestry enterprises were more likely to focus on decent work provisions for their labourers. Smaller enterprises, while aware of most of their decent work obligations, were unable to implement them due to resource constraints. The case studies also revealed numerous opportunities for youth to participate in the forestry sector. These included tapping into existing government and NGO programmes ranging from tree planting to plantation management. Additional employment opportunities were provided by businesses in the sector and the management of woodlots for poles and fuel. The limiting factors for youth participation in the sector largely arise from the huge investment cost incurred by such participation, particularly access to and utilization of land and financial resources. Other limitations included a lack of relevant training and skills and poor working conditions. These conditions are compounded by few numbers and limited capacity of officers within the Labour Directorate to administer and enforce labour regulations. The report proposes decent work indicators and recommends both policy and implementation strategies to increase youth participation and decent work practices in the sector.

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