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Sustainability by numbers

Forest products at FAO








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    Last updated date 16/01/2024


    FAO. 2023. Sustainability by numbers – Forest products at FAO. Rome.




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    • Thumbnail Image
      Booklet
      La durabilité en chiffres
      Les produits forestiers à la FAO
      2024
      Tant que les modes de production et le commerce des produits forestiers resteront méconnus et ne seront pas évalués de manière adéquate, il nous sera impossible de bâtir la bioéconomie transparente et dynamique dont la planète a besoin pour prospérer. Les données relatives aux produits forestiers sont essentielles pour suivre les incidences et les innovations dans l’industrie mondiale du bois, lutter contre le changement climatique grâce au calcul des émissions de carbone et mettre au point des politiques équitables qui permettent de maintenir les services écosystémiques et de préserver les valeurs forestières indispensables aux populations. Autrement dit, les produits forestiers – et les données qui leur sont associées – constituent les piliers d’un avenir durable.
    • Thumbnail Image
      Article
      An innovative construction system made from local Mediterranean natural resources
      XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
      2022
      Also available in:
      No results found.

      Urban and population growth or recurrent natural disasters threaten the conservation and resilience of natural resources. Socio-economic challenges, such as rural depopulation and unemployment, are shared throughout many worldwide regions, among them the Mediterranean area in the South- West of Europe. Although the area of forests in this region is above 30%, it is a net wood importer because forest operations are too expensive for the current wood prices. Hence, not harvested wood accumulates in forests increasing the risks of natural disasters such as wildfires. Pine wood and cork in the Mediterranean Europe are local natural resources whose technical characteristics make them excellent raw materials for construction. Wood is not simply a light biological material whose processes of industrial transformation and production emit less greenhouse gas emissions than its competitors, but it also stores atmospheric carbon. The impact of the local construction sector could be reduced employing these natural resources. This article presents an ecological construction system based on natural biological materials to improve energy efficiency in public buildings. This system consists of interconnected panels made of indigenous biological resources. Its design facilitates the assembly and disassembly for reuse, extending service life and reducing the costs of demolition energy and waste. In south-western Europe there are few wooden buildings in comparison to other European regions. Therefore, it is where the potential climate change mitigation through the substitution of materials is maximized. The collaboration between specialists from these territories will allow the development of a sandwich panel made of local wood and cork. The proposed pilot actions will demonstrate the benefits of their use encouraging the replication of solutions and policies to foster the use of local biological resources to improve the energy efficiency of buildings throughout their life cycle. Keywords: Wood-based construction; cork; climate change mitigation; circular economy; rural bioeconomy ID: 3484680
    • Thumbnail Image
      Book (stand-alone)
      Impact of the global forest industry on atmospheric greenhouse gases 2010
      Also available in:
      No results found.

      This publication examines the numerous and complex connections between the global forest products industry (taken here to include roundwood production, pulp and paper, and wood processing) and the global carbon cycle, with the objective of characterizing the carbon footprint of the sector. The study considers six types of industry impact: carbon sequestration and storage in forests and forest products; emissions from manufacturing facilities or from electricity producers supplying these faciliti es; other emissions attributable to product manufacturing; emissions from product transport and use; emissions associated with end-of-life management; and emissions avoided elsewhere in society owing to the forest products industry. The analysis finds that the industry’s main sources of emissions are manufacturing (mostly because of fossil fuel consumption and electricity purchases) and disposal of used products in landfills. Globally, the impact of the industry on carbon in forests cannot be de scribed quantitatively because of the lack of data in many parts of the world and the complexity of the industry’s raw material supply chain. Data from some countries, however, suggest that sustainable forest management practices can be effective in keeping forest carbon stocks stable over time. Some of the carbon removed from the forest remains stored in forest products, providing significant benefits. Indirect greenhouse gas benefits resulting from the activities or products of the forest prod ucts industry, while difficult to measure, can be large and could be increased.
    • Thumbnail Image
      Booklet
      La durabilité en chiffres
      Les produits forestiers à la FAO
      2024
      Tant que les modes de production et le commerce des produits forestiers resteront méconnus et ne seront pas évalués de manière adéquate, il nous sera impossible de bâtir la bioéconomie transparente et dynamique dont la planète a besoin pour prospérer. Les données relatives aux produits forestiers sont essentielles pour suivre les incidences et les innovations dans l’industrie mondiale du bois, lutter contre le changement climatique grâce au calcul des émissions de carbone et mettre au point des politiques équitables qui permettent de maintenir les services écosystémiques et de préserver les valeurs forestières indispensables aux populations. Autrement dit, les produits forestiers – et les données qui leur sont associées – constituent les piliers d’un avenir durable.
    • Thumbnail Image
      Article
      An innovative construction system made from local Mediterranean natural resources
      XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
      2022
      Also available in:
      No results found.

      Urban and population growth or recurrent natural disasters threaten the conservation and resilience of natural resources. Socio-economic challenges, such as rural depopulation and unemployment, are shared throughout many worldwide regions, among them the Mediterranean area in the South- West of Europe. Although the area of forests in this region is above 30%, it is a net wood importer because forest operations are too expensive for the current wood prices. Hence, not harvested wood accumulates in forests increasing the risks of natural disasters such as wildfires. Pine wood and cork in the Mediterranean Europe are local natural resources whose technical characteristics make them excellent raw materials for construction. Wood is not simply a light biological material whose processes of industrial transformation and production emit less greenhouse gas emissions than its competitors, but it also stores atmospheric carbon. The impact of the local construction sector could be reduced employing these natural resources. This article presents an ecological construction system based on natural biological materials to improve energy efficiency in public buildings. This system consists of interconnected panels made of indigenous biological resources. Its design facilitates the assembly and disassembly for reuse, extending service life and reducing the costs of demolition energy and waste. In south-western Europe there are few wooden buildings in comparison to other European regions. Therefore, it is where the potential climate change mitigation through the substitution of materials is maximized. The collaboration between specialists from these territories will allow the development of a sandwich panel made of local wood and cork. The proposed pilot actions will demonstrate the benefits of their use encouraging the replication of solutions and policies to foster the use of local biological resources to improve the energy efficiency of buildings throughout their life cycle. Keywords: Wood-based construction; cork; climate change mitigation; circular economy; rural bioeconomy ID: 3484680
    • Thumbnail Image
      Book (stand-alone)
      Impact of the global forest industry on atmospheric greenhouse gases 2010
      Also available in:
      No results found.

      This publication examines the numerous and complex connections between the global forest products industry (taken here to include roundwood production, pulp and paper, and wood processing) and the global carbon cycle, with the objective of characterizing the carbon footprint of the sector. The study considers six types of industry impact: carbon sequestration and storage in forests and forest products; emissions from manufacturing facilities or from electricity producers supplying these faciliti es; other emissions attributable to product manufacturing; emissions from product transport and use; emissions associated with end-of-life management; and emissions avoided elsewhere in society owing to the forest products industry. The analysis finds that the industry’s main sources of emissions are manufacturing (mostly because of fossil fuel consumption and electricity purchases) and disposal of used products in landfills. Globally, the impact of the industry on carbon in forests cannot be de scribed quantitatively because of the lack of data in many parts of the world and the complexity of the industry’s raw material supply chain. Data from some countries, however, suggest that sustainable forest management practices can be effective in keeping forest carbon stocks stable over time. Some of the carbon removed from the forest remains stored in forest products, providing significant benefits. Indirect greenhouse gas benefits resulting from the activities or products of the forest prod ucts industry, while difficult to measure, can be large and could be increased.

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