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FAO and Traditional Knowledge: The Linkages with Sustainability, Food Security and Climate Change Impacts









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    Book (stand-alone)
    Survey of access and benefit-sharing country measures accommodating the distinctive features of genetic resources for food and agriculture and associated traditional knowledge
    Background Study Paper No. 70
    2023
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    The Commission, at its Seventeenth Regular Session, requested its Secretary to prepare, for review by the Commission’s intergovernmental technical working groups: an up-to-date survey of existing legislative, administrative and policy approaches, including best practices, for access and benefit sharing (ABS) for the different subsectors of genetic resources for food and agriculture (GRFA) and traditional knowledge associated with GRFA held by Indigenous Peoples and local communities, with the aim of identifying typical approaches and lessons learned from their implementation, as well as challenges and possible solutions. The current survey comprises a baseline desktop review of legislation, policy and literature. It provides a review of how countries address the distinctive features of GRFA and traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources for food and agriculture (TKGRFA) based on the letter of their ABS legislative, administrative and policy measures rather than on how these measures have been implemented in practice. It therefore does not provide an analysis of the state of implementation, the challenges involved and possible solutions to these challenges. As such, it aims to provide a basis for future empirical research on how ABS measures work in practice for GRFA subsectors. A specific objective is to provide a typology of legislative, administrative and policy measures applying to ABS for GRFA and TKGRFA.
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    Document
    Concept Note and draft programme. GIAHS Dialog: International Forum on Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems 29 May - 1 June 2013
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2013
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    International GIAHS seminar. Stakeholders Dialog with Dr. Parviz Koohafkan, GIAHS Global Coordinator. Around the world a myriad of family and community managed agricultural systems can be found that are part of humanity’s common heritage. Over centuries, generations of farmers and herders have developed complex, diverse and locally adapted agricultural systems, managed with time-tested, ingenious combinations of techniques and practices that lead to biodiversity conservation, food security, resi lience of ecosystems and their provision of essential goods and services for humanity. The High Level Session of the GIAHS Forum 2013 will discuss and provide its public with a better understanding of the agricultural heritage concept and raise awareness about evolving traditional systems and sustainable management of natural resources that contribute to world food security.
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    Project
    Project Document for Kenya and the United Republic of Tanzania. GCP/GLO/198/GER - Supporting Food Security and Reducing Poverty in Kenya and the United Republic of Tanzania through Dynamic Conservation of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage System (G
    Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS)
    2008
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    This project is the Sub-Sahara Africa component of the FAO global initiative on conservation and adaptive management of Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS). Two specific transboundary systems and their population will be targeted: Masaai pastoral system and upland agro-forestry systems. The “dynamic conservation” approach which the project is advocating will address adaptive management and conservation of productive landscape of Masaai and Upland communities and will build capacity of local communities in Kenya and the United Republic of Tanzania as a mean to achieve sustainable agriculture and rural development (SARD). It is expected that the project will also contribute to sustainable development through: (i) enhancing the benefits derived by local populations and indigenous peoples from the management, conservation and sustainable use of agricultural biodiversity and natural resources; (ii) adding economic value and sharing derived benefits from these systems; (iii) enhancing food security and alleviating poverty while maintaining ecosystem goods and services of traditional agricultural systems (iv) improving awareness and education among government agencies, local authorities and communities, and other stake holders; ( iv) d emonstrating “local livelihood benefits – global environmental benefits linkages” through agro-ecosystem a pproaches across government agencies, local communities, indigenous peoples and private sector; (v) g uarantee that the ri ght to adequate food is realized by ensuring that every man, woman and child, in the t arget communities, have the physical and economic access at all times to adequate food or means for its procurement; and (vi) disseminating key best practices and lessons learnt between implementing agencies, recipient communities and countries -locally, regionally and on a global scale.

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