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A cut for the poor. Proceedings of the international conference on managing forests for poverty reduction: Capturing opportunities in forest harvesting and wood processing for the benefit of the poor










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    Socio-economic effects of using timber harvested in forest development sites
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    In S. Korea, a resource-poor country, forest developments have been continuous for industrial development and economic growth. In 2019, about 7,000 ha of forest are developed for construction of roads, factories, etc. Timber harvested in these sites are about 1,44 million tons per year. In the past, 97% of timber harvested in forest development sites were treated as waste, and the remaining 3% were transplanted into landscape trees. In 2017, a system(the sell by public auction) for the utilization of timber harvested in forest development sites was established, and that operated by Korea Forestry Promotion Institute(KoFPI). Through the system, various socio-economic values such as generation of sales revenue, reduction of waste treatment costs can be obtained. Currently, 44,000 tons of timber harvested in forest development sites have been sold by public auction, it generated about USD 4.24 million in socio-economic value, including sales revenue and reduction of waste treatment costs. The KoFPI is contributing to increasing the use of wood and revitalizing the wood industry by utilizing waste wood resources. Keywords: Economic Development ID: 3623098
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    Parallel sessions: Climate change. Chapter Three of the Proceedings of the FAO International Symposium on the Role of Agricultural Biotechnologies in Sustainable Food Systems and Nutrition 2016
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    Chapter 3 contains the presentations dedicated to the theme of climate change adaptation and mitigation; climate change adaptation in the crop and forestry sectors, the use of biotechnologies in the adaptation to changing climate; livestock vaccines and market access; animal genetic resources; nitrogen management; biodiversity and economic aspects of climate change. The FAO international symposium on “The role of agricultural biotechnologies in sustainable food systems and nutrition” took p lace from 15 to 17 February 2016 at FAO headquarters, Rome. Over 400 people attended, including 230 delegates from 75 member countries and the European Union, as well as representatives of intergovernmental organizations, private sector entities, civil society organizations, academia/research organizations and producer organizations/cooperatives. The symposium encompassed the crop, livestock, forestry and fishery sectors and was organized around three main themes: i) climate change; ii) sustaina ble food systems and nutrition; and iii) people, policies, institutions and communities. The proceedings provide the main highlights of the symposium which covered a broad range of biotechnologies, from low-tech approaches such as those involving use of microbial fermentation processes, biofertilizers, biopesticides and artificial insemination, to high-tech approaches such as those involving advanced DNA-based methodologies and genetically modified organisms.

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    Towards the development of a strategy for sustainable commercialization of non-timber forest products in Kenya: A situational analysis
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    Non-Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) play a significant role in the livelihoods of Kenyans. This paper reports the key strengths that could be optimized, opportunities available, weaknesses that need to be mitigated, and threats that require recognition to have a strategy for the sustainable commercialization of NTFPs in Kenya. This study was funded by The Restoration Initiative (TRI) project being implemented by FAO and other partners. It involved consultations with 50 institutions and a review of relevant publications, reports, policies, legislation, and strategies. The key interventions in the sub-sector include research and development, resource assessment and mapping, value chain analyses, capacity building, value addition, piloting plantation production, and policy reviews for a limited number of products such as gums and resins, honey, aloes, and mushrooms. The major stakeholders are collectors, community groups, traders, National government agencies, County Governments, private sector actors, development partners, and civil society organizations. Key barriers to the commercialization of NTFPs include deforestation, traditional production, and harvesting technologies, inadequate bulking facilities, insufficient value addition, weak market linkages, and information systems as well as weak policy and institutional frameworks. It is concluded that sustainable commercialization of these products in the country requires a strategy that involves revision/domestication of laws and policies, public-private partnerships, research, innovation, value addition, technology development and transfer, capacity building, synergies and complementarities. Keywords: Non-timber forest products, situational analysis, strategy, Kenya ID: 3485349

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