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Transition towards agroecology of an arable farm in Belgium: a model for the future of agriculture






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    Towards the Future We Want - End Hunger and make the transition to sustainable agricultural and food systems - Brochure 2012
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    Healthy and productive life depends on food and nutrition security. Yet hundreds of millions of people suffer from hunger and other nutritional deficiencies, and the majority of those people derive their livelihoods from agriculture. We must recognize that the millions of people who manage agricultural systems - from the very poorest to the most commercialized producers constitute the largest group of natural resource managers on earth. Their decisions, as well as those of the world's 7 billio n consumers, are key to global food security and the health of the world's ecosystems. The conditions needed to achieve universal food security and nutrition, responsible environmental stewardship and greater fairness in food management intersect in agricultural and food systems at global, national and local levels. In the face of an expected global population of 9 billion in 2050, pressure on the world's agricultural and food systems will grow. Unless purposeful action is taken, even if the 60 percent increase in food production needed to meet effective demand is achieved, some 300 million people may still remain without adequate access to food. We can no longer ignore the interdependencies between hunger and malnutrition, and natural resources and the environment. We have known since the first Rio summit about the nature of the challenges we face and how to address them. Where we have fallen short is in recognizing and addressing the governance challenges that must be overcome in ord er to take the steps needed to achieve commonly agreed goals. Ultimately, success in eradicating hunger and the transition to sustainable patterns of consumption and production will depend on the decisions of billions of individuals – both producers and consumers. To make sure that proper policies are implemented, fair and effective governance systems are needed – systems that are transparent, participatory, results-focused and accountable.
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    Towards the Future We Want - End Hunger and make the transition to sustainable agricultural and food systems 2012
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    Improving agricultural and food systems is essential for a world with healthier people and healthier ecosystems. Healthy and productive lives cannot be achieved unless ?all people at all times have physical, social and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food which meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life? (FAO, 1996). Healthy ecosystems must be resilient and productive, and provide the goods and services needed to meet current societal needs a nd desires without jeopardizing the options for future generations to benefit from the full range of goods and services provided by terrestrial, aquatic and marine ecosystems. There are very strong linkages between the conditions to achieve universal food security and nutrition, responsible environmental stewardship and greater fairness in food management. They intersect in agricultural and food systems at the global, national and local levels. To emphasize these links, FAO has three main messag es for the Rio+20 summit: - The Rio vision of sustainable development cannot be realized unless hunger and malnutrition are eradicated. - The Rio vision requires that both food consumption and production systems achieve more with less. - The transition to a sustainable future requires fundamental changes in the governance of food and agriculture and an equitable distribution of the transition costs and benefits. FAO believes that the Rio vision will remain unfulfilled as long a s hunger and malnutrition persist. The sustainable management of agriculture and food systems is key to a sustainable future. Sound policies are needed to create the incentives and capacities for sustainable consumption and production and to enable consumers and producers to make sustainable choices.
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    52 Profiles on Agroecology: “The Regenerators”. New Zealand Farmers leading a progressive transition towards agroecology. 2017
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    New Zealand is an island nation in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean which due to its remoteness was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. It has a temperate climate with mean annual temperatures ranging from 10 °C (50 °F) in the south to 16 °C (61 °F) in the north. Pastoral farming is the dominant land-use and New Zealand’s economy, despite being a developed nation, is still heavily dependent on export earnings from agricultural exports.

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