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Sustainable approaches for rangeland management and livestock production in arid and semi arid regions of tropical countries.









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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Improving pasture management in arid and semi-arid lands in the Horn of Africa through Pastoralist Field Schools
    An implementation strategy to support pastoralist communities build resilience against drought
    2018
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    Recurrent drought, degraded rangelands and reduced access to traditional grazing lands have left pastoral communities in the Horn of Africa’s arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs) more vulnerable and facing severe livestock feed shortages. During dry spells, pastoral communities suffer from food and nutrition insecurity, as well as shrinking incomes occasioned by livestock losses and reduced livestock production. Climate change adds an extra layer of vulnerability to this already fragile ecosystem, exacerbating the underlying causes of poverty and food insecurity. Over the last ten years, the Horn of Africa has faced seven major drought events, which have killed more than half of the cattle population in the most heavily affected areas and decimated the livelihoods of millions of pastoralists each year. Estimates indicate that during the 2016/2017 drought, over 2 million livestock were lost in Ethiopia’s Somali region alone. In these areas, cattle milk production decreased by as much as 80 percent. During the past two decades, FAO and its partners have conducted Pastoralist Field Schools (PFS) in the Horn of Africa’s ASALs to address this challenging context. Specifically, this document describes how their recent experiences with PFS in Kenya and Ethiopia have contributed to restoring the livelihoods of livestock-dependent communities through improved pasture management.
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    Document
    The rangelands of the arid/semi-arid areas: Challenges and hopes for the 2000s 1998
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    Do we need to worry about the rangelands in the arid and semi-arid areas? Is there hope for these resources in the year 2000 and beyond? Is it valid to assume that the world's marginal rangelands will survive the extraordinary pressures which started around the mid-1950s as a result of the sharp increase in human population density? What can modern technologies bring to these areas, other than disaster and over-use? Nowadays, domestic animals are trucked to the remotest corners of the ea rth and plants that used to flourish under very irregular and scanty rain hardly get a chance to germinate. The seed banks are depleting rapidly, and the seasonally-rich grazing areas are turning irreversibly into barren lands. These are the cries of the times, and the agonies of the helpless. However, nature has its own defense mechanisms and strategies which it has maintained throughout the history of our planet. This paper explores the fore-mentioned issues from a historic and stati stical perspective. Issues relating to the validity and long-term sustainability of approaches to monitor and manage the extensive rangelands in a changing world are substantiated and discussed. Attention is also given to the socio-economic and technical relevance of high tech and conventional approaches towards understanding the dynamics of vegetation and livestock, the consumption habits of graziers, and the market forces. Consideration is given to the balance between natural and man -made defenses and strategies and responsibilities at national and regional (e.g., GCC) levels are explored, proposed and/or recommended.
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    Project
    Emergency Assistance to Restore and Improve Food and Nutrition Security of the Disaster-Affected Households in North, South and West Darfur States - TCP/SUD/3704 2021
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    Protracted displacement in Darfur has disrupted traditional agricultural based livelihood activities and eroded community capacity to withstand shocks Despite relative peace and stability in Darfur in recent years, around 1 6 million displaced people continue to live in camps and rural gatherings, according to data released by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Sudan in 2018 In addition, according to the 2018 Humanitarian Response Plan ( more than two million people in Darfur are food insecure The capacity of resident communities to host displaced people in the conflict affected areas, whether sedentary rural farmers or nomadic pastoralists, has been undermined In addition, low crop productivity associated with the lack of certified seeds and variable rainfall has forced many farmers to engage in shifting cultivation, encroaching on grazing routes and sites Vulnerable people among internally displaced persons ( returnees and hosting communities are increasingly vulnerable because of their reduced access to agricultural inputs and water, as well as a chronic shortage of basic services The conflict has also impacted pastoral traditional mobility and access to grazing and water resources for livestock, giving rise to resource based competition and tension between farmers and pastoralists.

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