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Animal Health in the 21st Century: Challenges and Opportunities

Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Initiative: A Living from Livestock









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    International Symposium on Sustainable Animal Production and Health
    Current status and way forward, Vienna, Austria, 28 June to 2 July 2021
    2023
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    The International Symposium on Sustainable Animal Production and Health – Current Status and Way Forward, organized by the Animal Production and Health Section of the Joint FAO/IAEA Centre of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, found its departing point in these challenges. Within the five days of discussions and debates, the Symposium comprised a panel discussion and eight thematic sessions: a) molecular tools for animal production and health, b) advances in vaccinology, c) emergency preparedness and response, d) zoonotic diseases, COVID-19 and ZODIAC, e) enhancing livestock’s contribution to One Health and the Sustainable Development Goals, f) challenges for better livestock production in the developing world; g) advances in biotechnologies for improving livestock breeding and feeding, h) application of improved technologies for sustainable livestock productivity: the way forward. The symposium, held virtually, was attended by more than 3000 participants and observers from more than 160 countries, as well as by representatives of international organizations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). The more than 50 presentations were related to research and development actions for the sustainable improvement of animal production and health, emphasizing the role of nuclear technologies. These presentations were complemented by more than 145 synopses and posters from the participants, which were made available in a Book of Synopses. This publication is a compilation of the contributions emanating from the symposium. It encompasses the three opening speeches of the IAEA Director General, Mr. Rafael Mariano Grossi, the FAO Director General, Mr. Qu Dongyu, and the OIE Director General, Ms. Monique Eloit; and 47 papers from participants and speakers, which have been peer-reviewed by FAO and IAEA colleagues, independent outside experts and the Scientific Committee. The Book of Proceedings provides vital information and evidence on how nuclear and nuclear related techniques can contribute to the development of sustainable livestock production systems, as well as noting the constraints and opportunities for their use in developing countries. The book hopes to serve as guidance for scientists as well as government and institutional policy and decision makers.
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    Global Public Health and Transboundary Animal Diseases: Issues and Options, Approaches and Concerns 2010
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    Transboundary animal diseases will continue to emerge around the globe, with human-to-human spread potential, and multiple associated costs to societies and governments. These emerging threats can be addressed and reduced through the application of holistic and proactive disease risk management approaches that build on disease intelligence, multidisciplinary collaborations, public-private partnerships, international commitments, and scientific progress. Although a focus on biosecurity measures a long the production and marketing chain have proved beneficial so far, there is need to broaden measures geared to increase awareness among at-risk populations and targeted educational campaigns at vulnerable communities with the goal of changing, or at least influencing, the demeanours, habits and behaviours of people in such a way that the risks of disease contraction and transmission are decreased. For instance, the United States and the European Union are addressing the emergence and intensi fication of emerging biological threats across diverse ecological landscapes through identification and early tackling of critical disease drivers and risk factors. A key aspect of the approaches proposed is that they rely on working with economic actors and that they aims to develop with them sets of safe practices in production, processing, transportation, marketing and handling that are seen as coherent, applicable, practical, and in line with the realities in the ground. Further issues that need to be considered are cost-effectiveness, conflicts of interests, and sustainability.
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    The last hurdles towards Rift Valley Fever control
    Report on the ad hoc workshop on the current state of Rift Valley fever vaccine and diagnostics development – Rome, 5–7 March 2014
    2015
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    In the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in the development of Rift Valley fever (RVF) vaccines, and several next-generation vaccines are currently being evaluated in registration trials. However, due to the sporadic, yet explosive nature of RVF outbreaks, the challenge remains to have these vaccines available at the right time and place. Innovative, appropriate diagnostics will aid in the selection of vaccines and will help to determine when to vaccinate animals. To address these i ssues, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) organized a technical workshop in March 2014. The workshop was supported by the National Center for Foreign Animal and Zoonotic Disease Defense (FAZD) and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with representatives of the Central Veterinary Institute, Wageningen University and Research Centre (CVI-WUR), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Global experts in RVF vaccine development, leading veterinary vaccine manufacturers and the chief veterinary officers from Egypt, Kenya, Mauritania, Senegal and Sudan attended the meeting. Issues related to the application of classical vaccines in endemic areas were discussed, as well as novel vaccines that are already used in the field or are currently being evaluated in registration trials. These vaccines are expected to fulfil the features related to safety and efficacy recommended in the previous FAO meeting, held in Rome in January 2011. Due to these developments, we have entered a new era in which effective vaccines for the widespread vaccination of livestock will be available. Logistical and political issues are the last major hurdles to RVF control.

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