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Special Report Ethiopia- February 2006









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    Africa Report - No. 2 September 2005 2005
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    Eastern Africa: Prospects for the 2005 main season cereal crops have improved in some major producing areas of the subregion due to favourable rains. The overall food situation, however, remains precarious with high malnutrition rates reported in several countries in the subregion due to the effects of war, displacement and earlier droughts. Currently, more than 18 million people in the subregion depend on humanitarian assistance. The situation in Sudan is particularly alarming due to con tinued conflict that has resulted in a serious food situation, especially in Darfur and southern Sudan. In Somalia, recent assessments indicate severe food insecurity in several parts of the country. Below average 2005 main “gu” season harvest in southern Somalia coupled with an upsurge in civil strife have exacerbated the situation. Nearly one million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. Recent food aid pledges for Eritrea and Ethiopia have boosted the food aid pipeline, but deliv eries need to be accelerated. Southern Africa: About 12 million people in the subregion, two-thirds of them in Zimbabwe and Malawi, are in need of emergency food assistance in the current marketing year. The situation is expected to worsen during the lean months until the next harvest in April-May, unless international relief is provided urgently. Most countries of the subregion including Zimbabwe, Botswana, Malawi, Namibia, Lesotho, Zambia and Swaziland have gathered below average main s eason cereal harvests in 2005. In Zimbabwe, high inflation coupled with shortages of maize grain and fuel as well as transport problems are causing serious food insecurity. For the same reasons, prospects for 2006 are dire, regardless of rainfall. In Malawi, about 4.6 million vulnerable people are facing severe food shortages and require an estimated 414 000 tonnes of cereals in emergency assistance. Current high maize prices are exacerbating the situation. Above average cereal harvests ha ve been estimated for South Africa, Angola, Mozambique and Madagascar. South Africa’s record maize harvest of 12.4 million tonnes is estimated to result in an exportable surplus of about 5 million tonnes, more than enough to cover the subregion’s import requirements. WFP’s regional Protracted Relief and Recovery Operation has so far received only 30 percent of the 704 000 tonnes requirement over a three-year period (2005-07). Western Africa: The Sahel and northern parts of coastal countrie s continue to face a difficult lean season, due to depleted household food stocks and unusually high food prices. However, current season crop development in the Sahel has been satisfactory so far in main producing zones, due to favourable growing conditions. In Niger, the food situation remains critical, and WFP has expanded its emergency operation to assist 2.5 million people until the end of the lean season in October. In Côte d’Ivoire, insecurity, labour shortages and the de facto partit ion of the country continue to disrupt agricultural production and marketing activities. In Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, food assistance continues to be needed for internally displaced people and refugees. Central Africa: Cereal harvests of the main season (2005B) were favourable in Rwanda and Burundi with improvements in the order of 33 percent and 7 percent above the five-year averages in the two countries, respectively. Food insecurity persists in the violence-prone eastern part of DRC and in pockets of chronically vulnerable districts in Burundi and Rwanda.
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    Special Report Angola- July 2006 2006
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    • Rainfall was the main determinant for Angola’s crop production in 2005/06, with much of the country experiencing excessive rains and/or longer dry spells than usual. • With the recent re-settlement trend in former agricultural areas, there was a small increase in land under cultivation compared with 2004/05, but crop yields were generally lower as a result of poor rainfall distribution. • Production of 2006 maize, the dominant cereal crop, is estimated at 579 000 tonnes, a reduction of ov er 20 percent from the previous year’s record harvest. Total cereal production is estimated at 742 000 tonnes, down 15.5 percent on last year but up 7 percent on the average of the previous five years. A drop of about one-third in cereal production is estimated in the most affected central provinces of the country. • It is expected that there will be a cereal import requirement of about 843 000 tonnes for marketing year 2006/07 (April/March), including about 217 000 tonnes of maize. Accounting for commercial imports estimated at 776 000 tonnes, there remains a net cereal deficit of about 67 000 tonnes. • The supply of cassava in the north of the country is plentiful. Cassava flour is generally available in most local markets; however, it is not widely traded throughout the country. • Livestock condition is good; pasture and access to water were problems in the areas where dry spells were experienced (in the south and centre), but became satisfactory following heavy rains in March and April. • Despite much progress made over the past few years, some households of refugees and IDPs have not established food security. They add to the number of vulnerable groups, including some female-headed households, and the sick and elderly. • Approximately 800 000 persons will require some assistance - food and non-food - until the next harvest in May 2007. This is about 71 percent of those determined to require assistance in 2004 and 42 percent of the number for 2003.
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    Special Report FAO/WFP Crop and Food Security Assessment Mission to South Sudan 2016
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    The Mission estimated the 2015 net cereal production in the traditional sector at about 921 000 tonnes, about 9 percent below the 2014 very good output, but still about 16 percent above the last five-year average production. Despite some dry spells between May and August, seasonal rains in 2015 have been generally abundant and prolonged until December. Major reductions in output have been reported in Western Bahr el Ghazal and Eastern Equatoria states due to unfavourable rainfall as well as in W estern Equatoria State due to the disruption of cropping activities following worsening security conditions. The overall cereal deficit in January-December 2016 marketing year is estimated at about 380 000 tonnes, over 130 000 tonnes higher than the deficit estimated for 2015. About 12 percent of the population was estimated to be severely food insecure at end of 2015, a record level during the harvest period. Food security worsened not only in conflict affected areas of Greater Upper Nile Regi on, but also in other states as a consequence of the economic downturn and skyrocketing prices which limited access to food for most households. In 2016, WFP plans to assist 3 million people providing about 315 000 tonnes of food. Although a large component addresses the needs of people directly affected by conflict in the Greater Upper Nile Region, WFP assistance will also focus on school feeding, nutrition interventions and food for assets programs. The Mission stressed that the achievement o f a stable and lasting peace is paramount in order to progress in terms of agricultural development and improving food security. In order to strengthen local production and reduce the food gap in 2017, FAO’s emergency response will assist over 3 million people with agricultural inputs (often through a system of seed fairs and vouchers) to support planting activities, as well as vegetable and fishing kits, and livestock vaccination/treatment. Moreover, FAO is implementing several resilience build ing programs in the Greater Equatoria and Bahr El Ghazal regions.

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