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Mapping supply and demand for animal-source foods to 2030











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    Book (series)
    Notes on livestock, food security and gender equity 2011
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    Around 2.6 billion people in the developing world are estimated to have to make a living on less than $2 a day and of these, about 1.4 billion are ‘extremely’ poor; surviving on less than $1.25 a day. Nearly three quarters of the extremely poor – that is around 1 billion people – live in rural areas and, despite growing urbanization, more than half of the ‘dollar-poor’ will reside in rural areas until about 2035. Most rural households depend on agriculture as part of their livelihood and livesto ck commonly form an integral part of their production system. On the other hand, to a large extent driven by increasing per capita incomes, the livestock sector has become one of the fastest developing agricultural sub-sectors, exerting substantial pressure on natural resources as well as on traditional production (and marketing) practices. In the face of these opposing forces, guiding livestock sector development on a pathway that balances the interests of low and high income households and reg ions as well as the interest of current and future generations poses a tremendous challenge to policymakers and development practioners. Furthermore, technologies are rapidly changing while at the same time countries are engaging in institutional ‘experiments’ through planned and un-planned restructuring of their livestock and related industries, making it difficult for anyone to keep abreast with current realities. This ‘Working Paper’ Series pulls together into a single series different strand s of work on the wide range of topics covered by the Animal Production and Health Division with the aim of providing ‘fresh’ information on developments in various regions of the globe, some of which is hoped may contribute to foster sustainable and equitable livestock sector development. This paper follows on a previous FAO study that used remotely sensed and other environmental data to map poverty in Uganda (FAO, 2006) and extends it to the Horn of Africa, incorporating additional environmenta l and sociological variables. Furthermore, instead of using a direct measure of poverty, this study investigates the use of the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) Wealth Index (WI) as a proxy for a regional welfare measure.
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    Book (series)
    Wealth index mapping in the Horn of Africa 2011
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    Around 2.6 billion people in the developing world are estimated to have to make a living on less than $2 a day and of these, about 1.4 billion are ‘extremely’ poor; surviving on less than $1.25 a day. Nearly three quarters of the extremely poor – that is around 1 billion people – live in rural areas and, despite growing urbanization, more than half of the ‘dollar-poor’ will reside in rural areas until about 2035. Most rural households depend on agriculture as part of their livelihood and livesto ck commonly form an integral part of their production system. On the other hand, to a large extent driven by increasing per capita incomes, the livestock sector has become one of the fastest developing agricultural sub-sectors, exerting substantial pressure on natural resources as well as on traditional production (and marketing) practices. In the face of these opposing forces, guiding livestock sector development on a pathway that balances the interests of low and high income households and reg ions as well as the interest of current and future generations poses a tremendous challenge to policymakers and development practioners. Furthermore, technologies are rapidly changing while at the same time countries are engaging in institutional ‘experiments’ through planned and un-planned restructuring of their livestock and related industries, making it difficult for anyone to keep abreast with current realities. This ‘Working Paper’ Series pulls together into a single series different strand s of work on the wide range of topics covered by the Animal Production and Health Division with the aim of providing ‘fresh’ information on developments in various regions of the globe, some of which is hoped may contribute to foster sustainable and equitable livestock sector development. This paper follows on from a previous FAO study that used remotely sensed and other environmental data to map poverty in Uganda (FAO, 2006) and extends it to the Horn of Africa, incorporating additional environ mental and sociological variables. Furthermore, instead of using a direct measure of poverty, this study investigates the use of the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) Wealth Index (WI) as a proxy for a regional welfare measure.
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    Book (series)
    Status and Prospects for Smallholder Milk Production
    A Global Perspective
    2010
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    In 2005, some 1.4 billion people lived in absolute poverty and that nearly 1 billion were affected by chronic mal- or undernutrition. An estimated 75 percent of the world’s poor live in rural areas, and at least 600 million of these keep livestock that enable them to produce food, generate cash income, manage risks and build up assets. With the valuable contribution that livestock makes to sustaining livelihoods, especially in rural areas, the development of small-scale livestock enter prises could be a key element of efforts to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger. Milk production is an important livestock-sector activity and it is estimated that nearly 150 million farm households throughout the world are engaged in milk production. Small-scale milk production not only improves food security of milk producing households but also creates significant amounts of employment in the entire dairy chain, which comprises many small-scale rural processors and intermediaries . On the other hand, demand for milk and milk products is steadily growing, particularly in developing countries. If supply is to keep pace with the growth in demand, milk production will need to grow by close to 2 percent per year.

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